Tag: Twi


Twi classes in London brought to you by Ghana Union

Are you 16+ want to learn Twi? Then register now for Twi classes in North and South London. Both classes run for 12 week and its only £5 per lesson! What are you waiting for? Sign up now!

SOUTH LONDON

Starting Friday 5th May

Time: 6.30-8pm

Venue: Walworth Methodist Church (Clubland), 54 Camberwell Road, London, SE5 0EW

 

NORTH LONDON

Starting 6th May

Time: 11am-12.30pm

Venue: 12 Finspace, 225-229 Seven Sisters Road, Finsbury Park, London, N4 2DA

 

For any inquiries email starproject@ghanaunion.org.uk

 

 

YƐN ARA YƐ KASA NI: LEARNING TWI, FANTI, ITALIAN AND ENGLISH

I was speaking about languages the other day, and it was interesting to see how people approach language and the reason behind it. I said I speak four languages. Truth! But I can read and write only two of them – English and Italian. I can speak and understand Fanti and Twi, but there’s so much work to be done around them because I don’t understand all things – i.e. proverbs.
My knowledge of these languages has been subject to needs and circumstances beyond my control for the most part.

Take English for example, I learnt it because I needed it for university. When I got accepted to study in England, that was a necessary move. When it comes to Italian, I had to learn it because my parents moved me to Italy when I was 8 years old. I had to go to school and live there (against my will lol) so I had to learn it. Before the age of 9, Twi was the only language I spoke fluently. I started learning and understanding Fanti properly when I started living with my dad (he’s Fanti, he refuses to speak Twi lol). I’d speak to him in Twi and he’d respond in Fanti! Some people argue that Fanti and Twi are the same, but they are not, although they are both Akan languages. I often think about them as Spanish and Italian: they both come from Latin, but have evolved differently. If one speaks Italian, one can kinda figure out some Spanish and be alright.

I think from the age of 10 or 11, in my household we spoke all four languages interchangeably (I had a little English going because my parents spoke it to my sisters and I sometimes).

In all this learning, credit goes to my parents for making sure I did not lose our native language. I have friends whose parents chose to speak only Italian or English to them. Some parents were tapping into their children’s knowledge to learn the language themselves – i.e. Italian. I believe the intention was great, but the result not so much because some friends ended up losing the ability to speak and/or understand our native languages.

I definitely want to work more on my Akan – Twi in particular. There are concepts that can never be translated into a Western language, because Western philosophy and ontology are different from Akan ways of being; and I think, because language is the medium through which concepts and ideas are formed, one can never understand a culture fully, unless one knows the language. I think Twi sounds fun and hilarious, Fanti sounds sweet, maybe that’s why some Takoradi boys got girls for days but anyway I digress.

Interesting fact: I don’t know how to count numbers in Twi. I’m learning now.

By Benjamina E. Dadzie

Pɛpɛɛni, ntaafuo, eblutor and the prejudices we have of each other

A few weeks ago, there was an interesting discussion on Ghanaweb following Charles Agbenu’s article in which he castigated all Ghanaians who regard themselves as not being northerners for looking down on people of “northern extraction” in Ghana. Agbenu’s article was a politically motivated one but the issues it raised concern us all as Ghanaians and the way we think of each other.

One of the points of contention in Agbenu’s article had to do with the true meaning, or otherwise, of the Twi terms PƐPƐƐNI and NTAAFUO. This follows another ghanaweb columnist, Kofi Ata’s argument that the two terms did not, originally, have any negative connotations. Kofi Ata had written an article in which he said his mother had told him that PƐPƐƐNI came about as a result of Akans who perceived Northerners who had come south in search of employment as people who were truthful and did things “pɛpɛɛpɛ” (exactly or fairly). He added that they were referred to as NTAAFUO because they always moved in pairs like twins”.

regions of Ghana

regions of Ghana

Many commentators saw this explanation as very illuminating. This led to a rejoinder to Agbenu’s article that appeared the day after. Kofi Ata’s explanation of how the two terms came about was, indeed, interesting. But it had a few problems. In the first place, there was no way of establishing the fact that what Kofi Ata’s mother told him (Kofi Ata) constituted the unvarnished truth and was, indeed, how the terms came about. Other commentators said their mothers and grandmothers told them different stories. Some said pɛpɛni came about because these migrants were perceived as miserly (“pɛpɛɛnfuo”) and they were called ntaafuo because they bought similar items in the market as you would buy similar dresses for twins. What this shows is that it is only a properly conducted research work that can establish the correct etymology of the terms. The only thing we can be sure of is what their current usages denote in Ghanaian society.

Another fact is that no matter how the terms originated, they came about as nicknames for a group of people who never called themselves by those names. These people, having lived long in their new areas, came to know the names by which their hosts called them. They either did not like these names or did not care. Then there is this thing about nicknames. Even though they can be given to denote positive traits, they are most often given to denote negative traits.

Agbenu Charles also equated the terms “pɛpɛɛni” and “ntaafuo” with what he termed as their

Ewe dancers

Ewe dancers

equivalents in the other major Ghanaian languages. He said the Ewes call Northerners “dzogbedzitor” and the Gas say “senu”. The Ewe commentators went up in arms against Agbenu arguing that the Ewe term was not equivalent to the Akan terms. They said the Ewe term only denotes people who come from the grasslands or Sahara or a dry place and no abusive connotations are involved.

The Akans have a word for Northerners that can be said to be neutral: ESREMFUO (ESREMNI singular). The literal meaning is the same as the Ewe equivalent: people from the grasslands. Nobody who uses the term “esremfuo” can be accused of trying to look down on people from the North unless the person intentionally gives it a twist that makes it so.

The Ga term for Northerners, “Sanu” is said to be the shortened form of the Hausa greeting: “Sanu kede?” (How are you?) It is not, exactly, neutral.

13616_2014_12_MOESM1_ESMThe thing to be noted here is that any term used to denote some other people as different from us can, very easily, degenerate to a notion of “different and inferior”.  This is often so when it is the dominant and more powerful group that is marking the difference. That is why people have fought segregation (separate development) everywhere. And that also explains why the whites who come to live among us in Ghana do not quite like it when we call them “obroni”, “blofo” or “yevu” until they come to realise that we do not mean anything offensive by those terms. Even so, the supposed original meanings of the terms may not exactly be complimentary to the white man. The Twi term “obroni” begun as two words “(a)bro ni” (wicked man) and the Ewe term “a-yevu” means a cunning dog “the one who feigns niceness and bites you”, as Yaa Gyasi puts it in her much praised debut novel (HOMEGOING). I have not been able to find out how the Ga “blofo” came about. But, as with pɛpɛɛni and ntaafuo, the true origins of all these terms may have been lost.

There are other terms we all use to refer to each other whether for good or for bad. In Kumasi, there is Anwona. This is a corruption of the correct pronunciation of Anlo which is beyond most Twi speakers. The “nw” is a nasal sound as in the Twi “anwanwado” (amazing love). It has no negative connotations…

The Ewes call all Twi speakers “eblutorwo”. I have not been able to find out how this term came about. It seems the Ewes themselves don’t quite know how they came to call all Akans “eblutorwo”. If you ask any Ewe if the term is derogatory, they are quick to say it is not. But, again, from the contention of denoting otherness explained above, any term a people use to denote another people can easily degenerate to the regard of those other people as inferior. But, surely, Ewes do not regard Akans as inferior! Or, do they?

“Eblutorwor” seems to be the counterpart of “ayigbefuo” which many Akans will tell you is not

derogatory. Ga legend has it that when they were migrating to the present day Ghana, the chief

Homowo festival of the Ga people

Homowo festival of the Ga people

who had the royal stool in his keeping lost his way and gradually settled in what is now Anecho in present day Togo. When the Gas realised this, they sent emissaries to the “lost tribe” to retrieve the stool. But the chief of the “lost tribe”, known as Ayi, refused to hand over the stool. The emissaries came back to report this as “Ayi gbe” (“gbe” being the Ewe word for “refuse”). They said Ayi said “megbe” (I refuse). The combination of “Ayi” and “megbe” came to be used to refer to Ewes as “ayigbe”. Since the chief refused to hand over something that did not, technically, belong to him, he was said to have stolen it. This gave rise to “ayigbe dzulor” – a negative epithet that clouds all Ewes in the imagination of some non-Ewes. Whether this story is true or not, today, Akans join Gas to call Ewes “ayigbe”. Indeed, and one is more likely to hear “ayigbeni” or “ayigbefuo” than “ayigbenyo”. Perhaps it may be that the Akans, finding it almost impossible to correctly pronounce the word “Ewe”, took to the relatively easier to pronounce “ayigbe” even though the sound produced by “gb”, common in many West African languages, does not naturally occur in Twi.

Today, it is more politically correct to refer to the people of the Volta Region as “Voltarians” in an

Northerners of Ghana

Northerners of Ghana

effort to prevent the mistake of regarding all citizens of the region as Ewes when only about half the population are Ewes. The term also clouds the myriad differences among the Ewes just like pɛpɛɛni and ntaafuo disregard all the differences among the peoples of the three northern regions of Ghana. The use of the term “Anlo-Ewe” to refer to the coastal Ewes does seem to be of recent origin and employed mainly by non-Ewes. The Anlos call themselves “ANLOS” (nothing more) and their fellow Ewes also call them ANLOS (nothing more). Even so, there are still many Akans who think Ewes are a homogeneous group all of who eat “akple and fetri-detsi”. But many Ewes are aware of the broader differences among the Akans – Asante and Fante in particular but also and Kwahu and Akuapem.

An instance of the majority laying claim to what is normal can be found for the term that Akans have for minority (?) languages they do not understand. The people who speak them are said to “potor” and the languages known as “potorkasa”. Some people say the term is not derogatory and refers to all non-Twi languages including even English. Others say there is a derogatory tinge to it as it originally referred to Northerners who had come to Ashantiland and who spoke poor Twi– “wonmo potor kasa no”.

There is an Ewe equivalent, especially among the mid-Volta Ewes. The speakers of the minority languages there (Likpe, Buem, Akpafu, etc) are called “fiafialawo”. These people do not speak: they “fia”. The Ewe term is somewhat derogatory and is not used for major languages like Twi, Ga or English. There is a historical example in the ancient world. The Roman and Hellenic civilisations regarded non-Greek languages as unintelligible. They sounded “baaa baaa” to “civilized” ears. This is how “non-civilized” tribes became known as –  barbarians!

Ashanti Chief at Akwasidae Kese celebrations

Ashanti Chief at Akwasidae Kese celebrations

There are other prejudices the various ethnic groups hold of each other. Akans think Ewes like juju, they have low self-confidence, and they are envious of Akans. Ewes think Akans (especially Asantes) like money too much and like to boast of it. But the Asantes think it is the Kwahus who worship money and will do anything for it. Ewes frown on the display of wealth and will prefer the rich to keep a low profile. Akans say Ewes hide their wealth because they are afraid of being “jujued” by their fellows. The two prejudices fit each other and give rise to some cyclical reasoning. If Ewes dislike the way Akans boast of, and flaunt, their wealth, it stands to reason that they (Ewes) should keep a low profile with their wealth. And if the Akan prejudice about Ewes is that the latter like juju, then the only reason why the Ewe person will not flaunt his wealth is the fear of being done in. Of course, times have changed. Everyone likes material wealth and wants to boast of it when attained. Who lights a lamp and puts it under a bed?

Prejudices, psychologists tell us, are ready made schemas we employ to meet what we do not know. They are normal to the human race and found in all societies. Since they are often formed prior to any supporting evidence, they can lead us astray. It is when we base our behaviour on them that things can go wrong. And using them for political advantage can be detrimental to the effort of building a strong nation that benefits all of us.
By Stephen Atta Owusu
Author: Dark Faces at Crossroads.

*I want to express my deepest sense of gratitude to my Ewe friend who provided immense information on the Ewes during the writing of this piece.*

Twi, Ga, Fanti or Ewe – lets learn!!

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Lost In Translation, an investigative documentary which aired a few months ago on OHTV highlighted a predicament in the British-Ghanaian community in the UK – we were at risk f losing our rich cultural heritage and identity due the decline of Ghanaian languages. The documentary highlighted a growing trend of British born Ghanaians unable to speak any of the local languages primarily due to their parents or older generation failing to pass on the languages.

So if you’re in that category – a British born Ghanaian unable to speak you mother tongue such as Twi, Ga, Fante or Ewe, then fret not because  help is at hand!

The Ghanaian Language School in London offers classroom-based adult language courses in various Ghanaian languages such as Twi, Fanti, Ga and Ewe. The courses are offered on a part time basis and you have the option of a 10 or 20 week course. The lessons last two hours and takes place once a week, so it won’t cause any major interruptions of you have a busy schedule. Alternatively, the Ghanaian Language School also the Coffee Shop course – where classes are limited to just 5 people per session.

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However if the classroom setting doesn’t appeal to you, the school also offers private tuition for a more personalized individual learning experience.

For those of you who have businesses in Ghana and wish to learn the local languages, the school also offer corporate courses and interpretation services for businesses, charities, government bodies and private clients.

So if you’ve always wanted to learn how to speak a Ghanaian language then this is the perfect opportunity for you. There are still a few spaces left so head to their website to register your place on the course now!

http://theghanaianlanguageschool.com/our-services/adult-language-courses/

 

Yaa Nyarko (@yaayaa_89)

Mista Sliva Let it off EP Launch Review….

 

Mr Kutu Sa Let’s it off at his EP Launch in London

So this past bank holiday Monday I was afforded the chance to round of my Easter weekend in style by attending the launch of Mista Silva’s new EP, Let It Off!

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The night started with much excitement. I got dressed into my finest attire purchased straight from Ghana and made my way up to Stoke Newington. Seeing as I’m from Peckham and I don’t have a north London visa I spent the first half hour on arrival circling the area trying to find out where on earth the venue was!

Within the first 5 minutes I notice the man of the hour himself, Mista Silva enter the lobby sporting the Me Firi Ghana varsity jacket. Whilst I was thrilled to see him support the movement it makes the task of writing this review ever more nerve wracking! At this stage I’m pondering going up to him and asking if he remembers meeting me at BellaRoma nightclub in Accra early last year; however at the risk of looking like a fanboy I “stay in my lane” and go about my business.

Stepping in the venue I saw so many familiar faces from my time living in Accra, I felt like I was in an Osu nightclub! The place was full to the rafters as the crowd danced away to the sounds of Shatta Wale, Sarkodie and Bisa Kdei, waiting for the show to start.

The first act to take to the stage was a rapper by the name of Eugy (@EugyOfficial). Coincidently I had come across him a few days earlier when I shared his #BalenciagaFreestyle on twitter. His style is truly unique. He smoothly integrates both Twi and English into his songs and makes something that both the man on the block and in the village can vibe to! Among the rising popularity of UK Afrobeats, pioneered by people such as Mista Silva, Eugy has managed to find his own sound that falls somewhere in between hip-hop/grime and Afrobeats. Expect big things from this brother!

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Now I have to admit, the next artist to take to the stage was not familiar to me. However if you’re into your Afrobeats you’d have to have been living under a rock to not hear the song he performed! The artist was DJ Afro B (@DjAfroB) and the song was the masterpiece Baba God. The whole crowd erupted as we all in unison sang the chorus together! Whether singing in English or French this man tore it up! He quite expertly used a traditional African practice of using music to worship and has made it current and funky! You could vibe to this in both the Church and at carnival. His two amazing dancers on either side of him completed the spectacle. Well done sir!

As we approached the headline act we were treated to a Kutu Sa dance off. Anyone whos tried (and failed in my instance) to learn how to do this dance will recognise the two guys who took to the stage from youtube.Over three rounds of Kutu Sa’ing later, the crowd could still not decide who was their winner! I suppose this just serves as a testament to how much they have mastered it!

At this stage you could sense the anticipation of the crowd to hear the man for whom we had all come to hear. The Kuta Sa dance off alongside the sounds being performed by the live band served as the perfect warm up for Mista Silva to grace the stage. He came to the stage in almost Fela-esque fashion, as the band reached a crescendo. In a flurry of energy he jumped on the stage and immediately got into performance of the lead track from his EP “Goes Down”. There wasn’t a soul in the building that didn’t feel the music and let it take over them! Everyone vibed from the energy that Silva was radiating. The greatest respect you can give an artist is that just by watching them perform a crowd can’t help but get on their feet and dance. Silva seemed to be able to do this naturally! As he continued to perform each song from the EP the crowds energy never waned! His last performance was of the bonus track, Nyame ah y3. This for me was undoubtedly the highlight of the show. Performing almost exclusively in Twi or pidgin English, Silva perfectly represented himself and his musical identity in this track. In his own words he “stands representing the UK and Ghana Music scene, but I stand here as a black star”. I felt the track Nyame ah y3 perfectly encapsulated that message. A special mention must go out to the live band who made the event a spectacle of African/UK music. I’m sure I wasn’t the only one who left the event thinking that Afrobeats  with a live band is truly something special!

As we wound down, just to demonstrate the humility of the man, Silva ended by giving thanks to the people that helped him get to where he is and also by giving a prayer. This humility and dedication to his craft will surely see him go far and remain at the top of the UK Afrobeats scene! A truly pioneering artist Silva has played his part in the rise of pride among African communities in the UK of their culture. Keep repping GH, keep repping Africa and keep repping the UK! Most importantly keep doing you because you’re doing us all proud!

Malachi Mukete (@MallyMukete)

British Ghanaians: Lost In Translation?

Presenter Ortis Deley is on a quest to discover the root causes of the decline in Ghanaian languages, being spoken in London, amongst British Ghanaians. Inspired by his own lack of fluency in a Ghanaian language, Ortis is intrigued by the stories of other successful British Ghanaians, who aren’t all fluent Ghanaian language speakers either.

He aims to encourage Ghanaians everywhere in Britain to learn their languages and therefore further embrace their cultural identity.

A few members of the Me Firi Ghana team and other influential Ghanaians within the Diaspora community feature in the show. We commend how the producer managed to bring the Ghanaian community together for this show but what is very relevant is the theme, as the question remains, are young Ghanaians (in Ghana and the Diaspora) more connected to Ghana but less aware of our cultural roots/identity? especially in regards to the Ghanaian language? watch the show and have your say below…

 

DATE OF TRANSMISSION6th March 2015 (Ghanaian Independence Day!)

TIME7pm

PROMOTIONAL VIDEO ADVERThttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yy4Gb2RvUm0

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Please connect with us on FB and twitter. Join the language debate and encourage people to learn a dying language to keep it alive!

FACEBOOKhttps://www.facebook.com/britishghanaianslostintranslation

TWITTER: @OHTV @sparklelightpro #lostintranslation

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Ghanaian Language School Hosts Workshop’s on 7 &15 February

Whether its Twi, Ga or Fante you want to learn this workshop is for you

Are you Ghanaian but can’t speak any of the languages? Are you Ghanaian who can speak some of the languages but want to learn more? Are you a non Ghanaian emigrating to or have an interest in Ghana and would like to speak the language? or are you simply someone who wants to learn a new language?

Whatever your reason any there is always a good one to learn the language(s) of a country with a rich culture and heritage.

The Ghanaian Language School (GLS) was founded by a husband & wife; Ben & Naomi Fletcher who both have a passion for celebrating their cultural identity. They run the school alongside three senior language tutors with a similar passion of the culture and languages of Ghana and bringing these to life.

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On the 7th and 15th February the GLS will be hosting Interactive Language Workshops. These fun and informal Work Shops will teach the basics of Twi, Ga or Fante  and inform participants about the services they provide. There will also have plenty of opportunities to network and sample some Ghanaian delicacies.  The Twi Worskshop will take place on the 7th from 6.30-9pm at Derbyshire House, St Chad’s Street, London WC1H 8AG. For those who want to learn Fante or Ga a workshop will be taking place on 15th from 10am -1pm and 2pm-5pm respectively at OneKX, 120 Cromer Street, London WC1H 8BS

All are welcome! You do not need to speak the language/s to attend.

Tickets are £32. To find out more or to register for this event please click here using the code MFGFEB14 to receive £5 OFF. Or alternatively call 07985 142 949 or email info@theculturalgroup.com . There are limited spaces, and payment is not accepted on the door, so register now while you still can!

To find out more about the Ghanaian Language School’s courses and events please visit their website: www.theghanaianlanguageschool.com.

Ben JK Anim-Antwi (@Kwesitheauthor)

 

Following Ghana’s 2012 elections in the U.S.

Follow Ghanaian Elections from Your Phone

AudioNow, America’s leading radio-by-phone platform announced today several phone numbers that can allow Ghanaian communities in the U.S. to listen to news of the upcoming presidential elections in Ghana.

Listeners can directly access radio content from Ghana, Germany, and the U.S. by dialling the station’s AudioNow number. These numbers are all based in the U.S.  and can be reached from any mobile device.  They are free to use through the customer’s voice plan.

Ghanaian Radio Stations:

Obimanso: 712.432.7758

ZangoFM: 415.655.0843

Sankofa Radio: 712.432.3264

GHRadio1: 712.432.4438

Adwenpa: 213.992.4235

The Ghanaian stations produce content in a variety of languages, from Twi to Hausa to English.  In a ground-breaking year for the Ghanaian elections, with 13 million registered voters and a peace agreement signed by all seven presidential candidates to ensure a peaceful election process, AudioNow is pleased to bring coverage of these elections, on a platform both accessible and affordable.

Boys vs Girls…

Are the Ghana mmaa more in touch with the culture than the Ghana mmarima?


As a proud Ghanaian lady who is passionate about all things Ghanaian I often find myself having witty discussions with my Ghanaian brothers on topics that affect those of us living in the Diaspora.

As a result of these discussions it has become apparent that some British born Ghanaian males have no idea of how to speak their native tongue whether it be Akan, Dagaare, Dagbani, Dangme, Ewe, Ga, Gonja, Kasem or Nzema.

This has prompted me to ask the question:

“Just how seriously do some British born Ghanaian males take their culture?”

Whilst their Ghanaian counterparts, i.e. the Ghana mmaa statistically tend to take learning the language & the culture more seriously with the aim to pass the rich knowledge onto their future children, the lads who I have spoken to tend to make this a back seat priority.

Whilst I realise that this is not true of all males it is an issue that needs to be addressed.

I asked some Ghanaian males what they felt being Ghanaian meant to them. It became apparent that embracing the food or the support of the national football team, keeping abreast of the politics back home, reciting the words to the national anthem or listening to the infectious beats of the ever popular hip-life music made them feel more Ghanaian.

But what about the language?

Where does it factor fit into their lives?

In a typical Ghanaian household most girls can often be found standing by the side of her mother whilst her mother teaches her how to cook traditional meals. They converse on a daily basis in the native tongue. Mum might say something in Twi & the child will respond either in English or Twi.

Thus reinforcing the learning, but what about the British Ghanaian boy? What is his role within the home?

Sure, they might know one or two words, but can they string a proper sentence together?

A male friend of mine told me that:

“It is his belief that some males do not feel fully connected to their roots because their parents did not make it a necessity for them to learn Twi. Therefore they relate to a more British existence”

It is my strong held belief that the education of a child starts at home. With that in mind it is down to our parents to ensure that we receive a balanced education within our ‘fie’

The mindset of the English language being the paramount language spoken at home whilst the native tongue becomes neglected must change. It has been proven in various studies that females are better at mastering languages than their male contemporaries.

Is it a possibility that the Ghanaian ladies will be left to shoulder the responsibility of teaching their young children Twi or Ga to name a few because the males are falling down where the language is concerned?

As I have said before & will continue to say we have a duty (male & female alike) to learn everything we can about our beautiful culture otherwise we are in danger of seeing it die & that is something that we should not make a reality.

What is your opinion?

By Caroline N. Mensah

 

Aspirations of the Ghanaian Youth…

Aspirations

Meeting young British born Ghanaians whom hold high aspirations makes me proud and optimistic for the future.

We are human beings with precious lives; therefore it is important to have plans and visions of how we would want to spend the rest of our lives. Whether it is making our family proud, or ourselves, or whether it has been achieving some kind of life-long ambition, or simply making the first mark in history.

Having ambitions help us to build and prepare towards making our visions a reality. Without visions/ambitions, preparation would be difficult. I remember in class asking my friend:

“Akosua what do you want to be in life”?

She replied;

“I want to be PRIME MINISTER”

Hearing the response waddle into my ears was wonderful. Another one of my class mates back in school, named Keisha, always preached in class to us about how she wanted to be a doctor, and explained to everyone her ideas about medicine, and what she wanted to set. The passion was flowing out of her lips like the kofordia waterfalls.

I remember walking into the pharmacy with hay fever with a friend, I approached the pharmacist asking him what I could take, he then kindly advised me whilst searching for medication on what to take. Meanwhile my friend who was with me, asked me:

‘How do you say, how are you in Twi’,

As I was about to reply, the pharmacist replied,

‘Eti sen”,

I was quiet startled, I then asked him,

‘Are you Ghanaian’?

He replied ‘Yes’

African_School_TeacherAs he provided me with medication for my hay fever, I walked away feeling highly satisfied, in fact he cheered up my mood – simply because he was a Ghanaian Pharmacist. The importance of letting our children stay in education is vital. The continual process of learning can mould our children into the perfect shape. Education is the key to every door. As Mikhail Baryshnikov stated: Do not try to dance better than anyone else. But only try to dance better than yourself”.

As we are still young and bright, we need to enrich ourselves with knowledge, which would stun the world, and ourselves.

Remember we are free to be whatever we want to be, the choice is in our hands!

By Trey’C