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Pɛpɛɛni, ntaafuo, eblutor and the prejudices we have of each other

A few weeks ago, there was an interesting discussion on Ghanaweb following Charles Agbenu’s article in which he castigated all Ghanaians who regard themselves as not being northerners for looking down on people of “northern extraction” in Ghana. Agbenu’s article was a politically motivated one but the issues it raised concern us all as Ghanaians and the way we think of each other.

One of the points of contention in Agbenu’s article had to do with the true meaning, or otherwise, of the Twi terms PƐPƐƐNI and NTAAFUO. This follows another ghanaweb columnist, Kofi Ata’s argument that the two terms did not, originally, have any negative connotations. Kofi Ata had written an article in which he said his mother had told him that PƐPƐƐNI came about as a result of Akans who perceived Northerners who had come south in search of employment as people who were truthful and did things “pɛpɛɛpɛ” (exactly or fairly). He added that they were referred to as NTAAFUO because they always moved in pairs like twins”.

regions of Ghana

regions of Ghana

Many commentators saw this explanation as very illuminating. This led to a rejoinder to Agbenu’s article that appeared the day after. Kofi Ata’s explanation of how the two terms came about was, indeed, interesting. But it had a few problems. In the first place, there was no way of establishing the fact that what Kofi Ata’s mother told him (Kofi Ata) constituted the unvarnished truth and was, indeed, how the terms came about. Other commentators said their mothers and grandmothers told them different stories. Some said pɛpɛni came about because these migrants were perceived as miserly (“pɛpɛɛnfuo”) and they were called ntaafuo because they bought similar items in the market as you would buy similar dresses for twins. What this shows is that it is only a properly conducted research work that can establish the correct etymology of the terms. The only thing we can be sure of is what their current usages denote in Ghanaian society.

Another fact is that no matter how the terms originated, they came about as nicknames for a group of people who never called themselves by those names. These people, having lived long in their new areas, came to know the names by which their hosts called them. They either did not like these names or did not care. Then there is this thing about nicknames. Even though they can be given to denote positive traits, they are most often given to denote negative traits.

Agbenu Charles also equated the terms “pɛpɛɛni” and “ntaafuo” with what he termed as their

Ewe dancers

Ewe dancers

equivalents in the other major Ghanaian languages. He said the Ewes call Northerners “dzogbedzitor” and the Gas say “senu”. The Ewe commentators went up in arms against Agbenu arguing that the Ewe term was not equivalent to the Akan terms. They said the Ewe term only denotes people who come from the grasslands or Sahara or a dry place and no abusive connotations are involved.

The Akans have a word for Northerners that can be said to be neutral: ESREMFUO (ESREMNI singular). The literal meaning is the same as the Ewe equivalent: people from the grasslands. Nobody who uses the term “esremfuo” can be accused of trying to look down on people from the North unless the person intentionally gives it a twist that makes it so.

The Ga term for Northerners, “Sanu” is said to be the shortened form of the Hausa greeting: “Sanu kede?” (How are you?) It is not, exactly, neutral.

13616_2014_12_MOESM1_ESMThe thing to be noted here is that any term used to denote some other people as different from us can, very easily, degenerate to a notion of “different and inferior”.  This is often so when it is the dominant and more powerful group that is marking the difference. That is why people have fought segregation (separate development) everywhere. And that also explains why the whites who come to live among us in Ghana do not quite like it when we call them “obroni”, “blofo” or “yevu” until they come to realise that we do not mean anything offensive by those terms. Even so, the supposed original meanings of the terms may not exactly be complimentary to the white man. The Twi term “obroni” begun as two words “(a)bro ni” (wicked man) and the Ewe term “a-yevu” means a cunning dog “the one who feigns niceness and bites you”, as Yaa Gyasi puts it in her much praised debut novel (HOMEGOING). I have not been able to find out how the Ga “blofo” came about. But, as with pɛpɛɛni and ntaafuo, the true origins of all these terms may have been lost.

There are other terms we all use to refer to each other whether for good or for bad. In Kumasi, there is Anwona. This is a corruption of the correct pronunciation of Anlo which is beyond most Twi speakers. The “nw” is a nasal sound as in the Twi “anwanwado” (amazing love). It has no negative connotations…

The Ewes call all Twi speakers “eblutorwo”. I have not been able to find out how this term came about. It seems the Ewes themselves don’t quite know how they came to call all Akans “eblutorwo”. If you ask any Ewe if the term is derogatory, they are quick to say it is not. But, again, from the contention of denoting otherness explained above, any term a people use to denote another people can easily degenerate to the regard of those other people as inferior. But, surely, Ewes do not regard Akans as inferior! Or, do they?

“Eblutorwor” seems to be the counterpart of “ayigbefuo” which many Akans will tell you is not

derogatory. Ga legend has it that when they were migrating to the present day Ghana, the chief

Homowo festival of the Ga people

Homowo festival of the Ga people

who had the royal stool in his keeping lost his way and gradually settled in what is now Anecho in present day Togo. When the Gas realised this, they sent emissaries to the “lost tribe” to retrieve the stool. But the chief of the “lost tribe”, known as Ayi, refused to hand over the stool. The emissaries came back to report this as “Ayi gbe” (“gbe” being the Ewe word for “refuse”). They said Ayi said “megbe” (I refuse). The combination of “Ayi” and “megbe” came to be used to refer to Ewes as “ayigbe”. Since the chief refused to hand over something that did not, technically, belong to him, he was said to have stolen it. This gave rise to “ayigbe dzulor” – a negative epithet that clouds all Ewes in the imagination of some non-Ewes. Whether this story is true or not, today, Akans join Gas to call Ewes “ayigbe”. Indeed, and one is more likely to hear “ayigbeni” or “ayigbefuo” than “ayigbenyo”. Perhaps it may be that the Akans, finding it almost impossible to correctly pronounce the word “Ewe”, took to the relatively easier to pronounce “ayigbe” even though the sound produced by “gb”, common in many West African languages, does not naturally occur in Twi.

Today, it is more politically correct to refer to the people of the Volta Region as “Voltarians” in an

Northerners of Ghana

Northerners of Ghana

effort to prevent the mistake of regarding all citizens of the region as Ewes when only about half the population are Ewes. The term also clouds the myriad differences among the Ewes just like pɛpɛɛni and ntaafuo disregard all the differences among the peoples of the three northern regions of Ghana. The use of the term “Anlo-Ewe” to refer to the coastal Ewes does seem to be of recent origin and employed mainly by non-Ewes. The Anlos call themselves “ANLOS” (nothing more) and their fellow Ewes also call them ANLOS (nothing more). Even so, there are still many Akans who think Ewes are a homogeneous group all of who eat “akple and fetri-detsi”. But many Ewes are aware of the broader differences among the Akans – Asante and Fante in particular but also and Kwahu and Akuapem.

An instance of the majority laying claim to what is normal can be found for the term that Akans have for minority (?) languages they do not understand. The people who speak them are said to “potor” and the languages known as “potorkasa”. Some people say the term is not derogatory and refers to all non-Twi languages including even English. Others say there is a derogatory tinge to it as it originally referred to Northerners who had come to Ashantiland and who spoke poor Twi– “wonmo potor kasa no”.

There is an Ewe equivalent, especially among the mid-Volta Ewes. The speakers of the minority languages there (Likpe, Buem, Akpafu, etc) are called “fiafialawo”. These people do not speak: they “fia”. The Ewe term is somewhat derogatory and is not used for major languages like Twi, Ga or English. There is a historical example in the ancient world. The Roman and Hellenic civilisations regarded non-Greek languages as unintelligible. They sounded “baaa baaa” to “civilized” ears. This is how “non-civilized” tribes became known as –  barbarians!

Ashanti Chief at Akwasidae Kese celebrations

Ashanti Chief at Akwasidae Kese celebrations

There are other prejudices the various ethnic groups hold of each other. Akans think Ewes like juju, they have low self-confidence, and they are envious of Akans. Ewes think Akans (especially Asantes) like money too much and like to boast of it. But the Asantes think it is the Kwahus who worship money and will do anything for it. Ewes frown on the display of wealth and will prefer the rich to keep a low profile. Akans say Ewes hide their wealth because they are afraid of being “jujued” by their fellows. The two prejudices fit each other and give rise to some cyclical reasoning. If Ewes dislike the way Akans boast of, and flaunt, their wealth, it stands to reason that they (Ewes) should keep a low profile with their wealth. And if the Akan prejudice about Ewes is that the latter like juju, then the only reason why the Ewe person will not flaunt his wealth is the fear of being done in. Of course, times have changed. Everyone likes material wealth and wants to boast of it when attained. Who lights a lamp and puts it under a bed?

Prejudices, psychologists tell us, are ready made schemas we employ to meet what we do not know. They are normal to the human race and found in all societies. Since they are often formed prior to any supporting evidence, they can lead us astray. It is when we base our behaviour on them that things can go wrong. And using them for political advantage can be detrimental to the effort of building a strong nation that benefits all of us.
By Stephen Atta Owusu
source Author: Dark Faces at Crossroads. amitriptyline 50 mg what is it used for
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*I want to express my deepest sense of gratitude to my Ewe friend who provided immense information on the Ewes during the writing of this piece.*

Introducing Ameyaw Debrah..

The Celebrity Blogger

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At 32 years of age, Ameyaw Debrah is already a mainstay in the journalism and social media sectors in Ghana, he garners the kind of respect in this field more akin to a veteran over his half age . His potential shone through early when he won the award for best publishing student whilst studying at the forex trading sessions Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in 2005.

The award provided a platform for Debrah to work with https://digitrading.biz/de/binaere-optionen/ binäre optionen iq option Ovation International Magazine whilst striking an agreement with the opzioni binarie autorizzate consob NSS (National Service Scheme) doing his national service. After his service he stayed on at Ovation and began contributing to the forex handel abgeltungssteuer Star Newspaper as a columnist.

In 2007 Debrah became the entertainment editor for Download and print the Suprax Savings Copay Card here. Reduce your go site cost to just . Ghanaweb and was in this position until 2009 when he decided to create his own website. Since its inception the sit has gone from strength to strength and has solidified Debrah as among the top celebrity/entertainment news bloggers in Ghana. His work has taken him all over the world to cover events  where he has interviewed some of the biggest names in entertainment and beyond such  as buy emsam uk (Bicalutamide) hormone therapy side effects, how it's given, how it works, precautions and self care tips for treatment of prostate cancer Kofi Annan, Belle Rose, Sigma-Aldrich offers a number of go to link products. View information & documentation regarding Roxithromycin, including CAS, MSDS & more. Trey Songz, INDICATIONS . levothroid 100 mg 09/2014 is used for treating high blood pressure, heart failure, and other heart problems. It may be used alone or with other medicines. Amber Rose, DESCRIPTION. prednisolone without a prescription ® (indapamide) is an oral antihypertensive/diuretic. Its molecule contains both a polar sulfamoyl chlorobenzamide moiety and a lipid Ludacris, Coptic, http://glacco.co/index.php/nuestros-servicios/implementacion-niif-2” the queen of herbs is also known as Holy Basil. Wyclef, where can i buy oxytrol® (furosemide) is a potent diuretic which, if given in excessive amounts, can lead to a profound diuresis with water and electrolyte depletion Mario. He has gained recognition from the Ghanaian diaspora in the UK when he was nominated for a http://danwaltersrealtor.com/ff7/voltaren-sr-tabletas-600mg.html is the prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis GUBA in 2012

Debrah has also been active in the television industry in Ghana. He contributes to Star Gist, an entertainment segment on AfricaMagic show that airs on the satellite channel DSTV, as a Skype correspondent. He also shares entertainment news Ghana. on EbonyLife TV an entertainment segment show which also airs on DSTV station.

In 2013 he won the Ghana Social Media Awards for Best Showbiz and Entertainment Blog; and the City People Entertainment Awards for Best Blogger or online reporter (Ghana). 

Debrah has turned the dream that manifested at University into reality and continues to be a positive personality in Ghana,He is a Malta Guinness Ambassador deal for the Africa Rising Campaign and also created another campaign, his own called my Ghana campaign in which he invites his readers to create one minute videos discussing relevant issues in Ghana

 A definite pioneer in his field, Ameyaw Debrah, Me Firi Ghana salutes you!

  http://pcgamesnew.net/allegra-odt-8-mg.html helps people stop smoking by reducing cravings and other withdrawal effects. Learn about side effects, interactions and indications. Me Firi Ghana recently caught up with the celebrity blogger himself  far a brief interview, see below for how it went;

viagra vs cialis cost® (desvenlafaxine) is FDA approved to treat depression. Read to learn how PRISTIQ works, potential side effects, and more. See risks and benefits. MFG: What made you want to start your very own website: ameyawdebrah.com?

Product Features... eutirox e actonel 5 mg 2mg sugar free gum is designed for smokers of 20 or less a AD: It was actually a joke. my friend offered to get me my own domain and host for me so we jokingly said lets call it ameyawdebrah.com but once I started providing content on it, it caught on and I stuck with it to build it.

Learn about Wellbutrin XL (minipress 2 mg prazosin Hydrochloride Extended-Release) may treat, uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling MFG: You seem like a thick-skinned person, even in the face of criticisms or unwanted attention. How do you personally deal with pressures that come with being in the spotlight yourself?

Introduction enter site is a plant alkaloid that is widely used for treatment of gout. Colchicine has not been associated with acute liver AD: I’m naturally a shy person so I surprise myself with how I’m able to cope with the public attention – good or bad. I have a good sense of humour so I use that to escape some of the criticism and I’ am my own worst critic, so people can hardly bring me down. I try to be cheerful when people give me attention and I’m a pleasant person so I just wear a smile, give a handshake or a hug and I’m done. Lol

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I no longer have any nervousness when I meet or interview celebs (well it depends on the celebrity lol). Most of the time I worry more about what to ask in order to make my interviews stand out and interesting.

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Find great deals on eBay for prednisolone buy uk and mentat. Shop with confidence. MFG: In the past you introduced an Iphone app ‘AmeyawBuzz’; in 2012, you formed ‘The Ameyaw Debrah talent hunt’. Now in 2014, is there anything you are definitely aiming to accomplish, that we should be in the lookout for?

provera bula 10mg® (alfuzosin HCl extended-release tablets) DESCRIPTION Each UROXATRAL (alfuzosin HCl extended-release tablets) tablet contains 10 mg alfuzosin AD: This year ameyawdebrah.com is 5 years and I’m innovating with new ideas to celebrate people who have been with me along the journey. I plan to have new and more exciting apps to embody the work I do and new technologies. I want to form new partnerships, travel more and see what is happening particularly in other countries of Africa. I have launched the myghanacampaign calling for people to send in short videos sharing their stories about Ghana. I plan to reward about 10 of the best stories by the end of the year.

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