Tag: Cape_Coast


Touring Ghana – Part 3

Central Region

Land of the fante people, home to some of Ghana’s best preserved castles and world heritage sites, beautiful beaches and exciting festivals, the central region is known as the heartbeat of Ghana’s tourism, and a visit to this part of Ghana is a must for anyone with a passion for history and culture.

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Getting there

Getting to the central region is fairly easy if you’re travelling from Accra or Kumasi. STC buses to the region’s capital Cape Coast leaves twice a day from Accra, and from Kumasi there’s a daily bus to Cape Coast as well. Best way to get around when in the region is trotro (local buses) or taxi.

Where to stay

Being a coastal region, the central region has many fantastic beach resorts one can stay at affordable prices. These include the Brenu Beach Lodge, Oasis Beach Resort, Biriwa Beach Hotel, Kokodo Guest House, Baobab Guest House, Nokaans Hotel, Hans Cottage Botel and Pedu Guest House to name a few. For a taste of mouthwatering dishes (and continental food) these are the restaurants to head to: Castle Restaurant, Kokodo Restaurant, Coast to Coast, Hayford Lounge and Bar and Baobab House, all located in Cape Coast.

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Things to do

The central region was the former government centre of Gold Coast and Cape Coast the seat of British colonial administration thus the region is very much steeped in history. The coastline of the region is dotted with forts and castles, most notably Cape Coast Castle, Elmina Castle, and Fort St Jago, which have been identified as World Heritage sites. For a small fee visit these places to discover the slave trade history of the region.

Not to be missed is the Donkor Nsuo (The Slave River) at Assin Manso, a place where slaves bathed in the river before they were taken to nearby Cape Coast and Elmina to be shipped off overseas.

Get stuck into the local culture by visiting the traditional fishing and crafts villages located in Winneba (famous for its fishing fleets, masquerade festivals and beautiful ceramics), Kromanste & Abandze (famous jazz player Louis Armstrong traced his ancestry here) and Gomma-Otsew-Jukwa (known for its fine pottery).

For beach lovers and those who want to get your surf on head to Brenu Beach, Breni Akyim, Gomoa Fetteh, Elmina and Winneba beaches, all dotted with palm trees, white sands and friendly locals.

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To observe nature at its best, head to Kakum National Park, where one can find diverse species of mammals, plants and insects. Activities offered at the park include walking tours, guided hiking, bird watching and the canopy walk for the brave and fearless (if you’re scared of heights this is NOT for you!)

Depending on what time you visit the region you can take part of the local festivals that happen all year round. These include the Fetu Afahye festival celebrated by the people of Cape Coast. Witness purification rites, procession of chiefs, drumming and dancing and firing of musketry. Another festival to look out for is the Akwambo festival celebrated by the people of Agona in the region.

Finally make sure you try some of the local dishes when touring the region. Dishes unique to this part of Ghana is fante kenkey, fufu and palmnut soup and eto (mashed yam or plantain eaten with peanuts and eggs)

So if you do decide to visit the central region, what I’ve touched on above are just a few of the things you can do in this part of Ghana. Happy touring!

 Yaa Nyarko (@yaayaa_89)

Ghanaian Culture: Me FiRi CAPE COAST…

Church in GhanaI was 14 years, it was a normal Sunday church service but a special preacher man had been invited. Everyone sat in eager anticipation but I was rather angry because my mum had forced me to sit next to her in the front row. My mind was racing double time to come up with a good excuse to move to the back row when the preacher man walked into the Church auditorium.

We all rose to our feet and closed our eyes in silence waiting for the
opening prayer. He let the silence lay for a couple of minutes. I
opened my eyes to see what everyone else was up to – it was the usual, people swaying back and forth as though possessed. As my mind began drifting onto other things, the preacher man spoke out into the microphone. He said a lengthy prayer to which the whole congregation responded to with a loud “Amen!” He then announced he had a revelation whilst he was saying the prayer.

My heart skipped a beat, was God trying to get back at me for looking around whilst everyone else prayed by revealing something naughty I had done earlier in the week? I slumped in my chair, eyes to the floor whilst sweat beads were forming on my forehead but thankfully God had let me off. The revelation was not about me, it was about Cape Coast! A group of British Business men were on their way to invest substantial figures into the local economy.

I was grinning from ear to ear. I did not realise how much I loved Cape Coast until that point. My beloved Cape Coast was on its way up!

Fast forward 14 years down “time lane” and there are no British investors in sight. Maybe this is one of the reasons I have so much distrust for the church system, but we will leave that for another day.

Cape_Coast_CastleAll I want to write about now, is my beloved Cape Coast. Since the preacher man’s British investors never turned up, I have taken it upon myself to sell Cape Coast to the world. Hopefully I can do a better job of attracting investors.

Cape Coast is a town steep in history. The castle and fort are grim reminders of a darker moment in the history of all black people but it is our history nonetheless, so for anyone in the black diaspora trying to find their roots, Cape Coast is a very good place to start the process of healing, reconciliation and building broken relationships.

Cape Coasters will always welcome you with arms wide open. For the sun seekers, Cape Coast is your ideal destination. If you think the beaches of Barbados are the real deal, then hold your breath! The beautiful beaches of the Cape coastline are better than anything you have ever seen in a Thomson’s holiday brochure. The strengths of the sea waves are pretty strong too, so the surfers amongst you can bring your boards to test it out.

Now for the businessmen amongst you, there is a vibrant market. Cape Coast has a university, a polytechnic and several senior secondary schools. If you know anything about business you would know that a uni town always has a healthy spending habit.

Finally I will make an appeal. Cape Coast arguable has five of the
best secondary schools in Ghana.

Many investor’s sons and daughters of Ghana, have been educated in Cape Coast schools. Now you owe Cape Coast a debt of gratitude. Spread the good word about the town which gave you your education. Bring your friends and family back on weekend breaks.

Visit the sights. Go run the sandy beaches. Show the world you are
proud to be associated with Cape Coast.

By Maclean Arthur