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Apostle Dr Kwadwo Safo Kantanka of Kantanka is the recipient of the GUBA Innovative Pioneer Award

Apostle and Founder of Ghana’s first car manufacturing company – Dr Kwadwo Safo Kantanka, will be honoured with the Innovative Pioneer Award on Saturday the 3rd of June, 2017 at the InterContinental Hotel, o2, London.

The Innovative Pioneer award recognises those who have made significant contributions to African society through inventions, manufacturing and production, to the benefit of Africa’s social, economic and international standing. Dr Kantanka’s revolutionary invention and its bid to develop Ghana’s business industries places him next to thirteen other innovators who are recipients of the coveted GUBA Black Star Awards.

Apostle Dr Kwadwo Safo Kantanka founded Kantanka Automobile Company Limited, following the manufacture of his first car, Kantanka Saloon in 1998. Realising the potential and gap in the Ghanaian automotive industry, he expanded and released the Kantanka Onantefo I and Onantefo II in 2007. Today, he has built a semi-automated vehicle assembly facility with a monthly capacity of 120 cars.

A successful engineer and inventor, Apostle Dr Kwadwo Safo Kantanka is the also the founder of Christ Reformed Church in Ghana. The church opened its doors in 1971 after starting out as a prayer group in 1969. It now has over 140 branches across Ghana with its core fundamentals – to care for the needy. Christ Reformed Church also encourages members to volunteer within agriculture and to regularly visit those in hospitals, prisons and orphanages.

The GUBA Innovative Pioneer Award will be presented to Dr Kantanka for successfully designing and creating the first vehicle manufactured in Ghana, at a standard that rivals competition within the automobile industry.

The prestigious GUBA awards ceremony celebrates the achievements of influential and inspirational members of the Ghanaian community. The star-studded event will be full of glamour, entertainment and motivation. For tickets to the GUBA 2017 awards, visit www.gubaawards.co.uk/ticket

GUBA 2017 is sponsored by – Title Sponsor: ECOM Ghana. Category Sponsors: uniBank Ghana, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Imperial Homes, ABN TV and Radio. CEO Dinner Sponsor: PayAngel.

Media Partners: ROK TV, VOX Africa TV, Starr Radio UK, Hot Digital Online FM, Rising Africa, Afropulp Magazine, The Voice Newspaper, Glam Africa, ABN TV and Radio, GHOne TV, Starr FM, OK FM, Peace FM, Adom TV, UTV, Hot Digital Online FM, Ahomka FM, FAB Photography, AKLASS photography, SWAG of Africa, Screen Nation, Inspirational You,

Partners: Final Effects Studios, NAS Studios, Anita Erskine Media, Precise Marketing, E-Volution International, Plant It Events and MakeUp Ghana. Material Sponsors: Vlisco, Kente Queen. Outfit sponsors: A-COTE Collections, Jay Renkyi. Travel Sponsor: Faze 2 Services

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For further information please contact: 

Claudia Andrews

Email: claudia@gubaawards.co.uk

 

 

MAIDIE ARKUTU IS THE GUBA 2017 FEMALE INFLUENTIAL LEADER

Maidie Arkutu, the Vice President of Unilever Francophone Africa, will receive the honour of being the recipient of the 2017 GUBA Black Star Award for Female Influential Leader, at the 2017 GUBA Awards. The awards is scheduled to take place on Saturday the 3rd of June 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel, o2, London.

In its sixth year, The GUBA Awards seeks to celebrate the consistency, dedication to excellence and longstanding contributions to society with the GUBA Black Star Awards. The Female Influential Leader Award recognises the actions of individuals with progressive influence on women in business. It also shines a light on those who use their exceptional style in providing direction, implementing plans and motivating to affect the development and behaviour of others and to assist them to succeed.

Miss Arkutu is a multi-skilled professional marketer with an extensive business portfolio and monumental leadership experience to hand. She has a postgraduate Diploma in Marketing from the Chartered Institute of Marketing, as well as a MBA from Vrije Universiteit Brussel and a BA in Business Economics from Vesalius College, Belgium.

Her ascent to the VP role at Unilever Francophone Africa was preceded by a successful three-year stint as Managing Director of Unilever Ghana. Before that MD role, she was the Marketing Director for Unilever West Africa, having joined the Unilver brand from Coca-Cola East and Central Africa Business Unit (ECABU) where she was the Marketing Manager for the Horn, Islands and Mid Africa sector (HIMA).

A born leader with significant influence, Maidie Arkutu has held various executive and non-executive board memberships at places such as Barclays Bank Ghana, and the African Business Centre for Developing Education, as well as the Lady Chairship/Executive Board Membership of the Executive Women Network (EWN).

The GUBA Black Star Award 2017 for Female Influential Leader will add to an already impressive collection of accolades received by Miss Arkutu, including the prestigious Marketing Woman of the Year 2015 (Chartered Institute of Marketing, Ghana) and Outstanding Manufacturing Executive, Personal Products 2016 (Feminine Ghana Achievement Awards).

This accolade is a result of her work in inspiring, supporting and empowering women executives to be internationally successful in the business world. The GUBA Awards 2017 is set to be a monumental event, tickets are available for purchase at www.gubaawards.co.uk/ticket/

GUBA 2017 SPONSORS – Title Sponsor: ECOM Ghana. Category Sponsors: uniBank Ghana, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Imperial Homes, ABN TV and Radio. CEO Dinner Sponsor: PayAngel.

Media Partners: ROK TV, VOX Africa TV, Starr Radio UK, Hot Digital Online FM, Rising Africa, Afropulp Magazine, The Voice Newspaper, Glam Africa, ABN TV and Radio, GHOne TV, Starr FM, OK FM, Peace FM, Adom TV, UTV, Hot Digital Online FM, Ahomka FM, FAB Photography, AKLASS photography, SWAG of Africa, Screen Nation, Inspirational You,

Partners: Final Effects Studios, NAS Studios, Anita Erskine Media, Precise Marketing, E-Volution International, Plant It Events and MakeUp Ghana. Material Sponsors: Vlisco, Kente Queen. Outfit sponsors: A-COTE Collections, Jay Renkyi. Travel Sponsor: Faze 2 Services

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For further information please contact: 

Claudia Andrews

Email: claudia@gubaawards.co.uk

 

Project 1957: TWI CLUB

After the success of their launch event last month, Project 1957 presents TWI CLUB!

Twi Club is designed to bring together beginner and intermediate Twi speakers (both Ghanaian and non-Ghanaians) and provide them with a fun, relaxed and unique environment where they can practice and improve their knowledge of conversational Twi, without the fear of ridicule.

We will have designated specialist speakers who will listen in on conversations, and guide where necessary, which will assist attendees in building confidence in their speaking ability.

We’d love for you to join us from 6pm to 8pm on Monday 8th May for this new and exciting initiative!

For queries, email us – info@project1957.com

Sign up >>>> here

Ghanaian Diaspora Homecoming Summit

UK Press Launch: Government to Woo Ghanaian Diaspora at Homecoming Summit in a Bid to Boost Agenda for Change Nations

On Friday 5th May, 2017 the GHANA High Commission UK hosted the Accra launch of an insightful event that will shift the paradigm of development and growth within the African continent, attracting Ghanaian personalities and dignitaries such as Capital Xtra’s DJ Abrantee. The event in question is the Ghana Homecoming Diaspora Summit 2017, where prominent leaders past and present both from the sub-continent and around the world are expected to join up to 500 Ghanaians living outside the country at the biggest gathering of Ghana’s diaspora in Accra for many years.


REPRESENTING: DJ Abrantee, centre, at the launch

The Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit will take place at the International Conference Centre in Accra, Ghana from 5th-8th July and is organised as a direct outcome of President Nana Akufo-Addo’s election campaign pledge to involve Ghanaians living abroad in the development of their country.

At the launch of the event in Accra this week, the Director of the Diaspora Relations Office at the Presidency, Akwasi Awua Ababio said:

“The Government is fully committed to the mobilisation and harnessing of the resources and skills of the diaspora community for accelerated development of Ghana. The diaspora community is equally committed to the challenge of being equal and recognised partners in the government’s development effort.”

The summit’s agenda will cover three main themes which will set-out the opportunities for business investment and employment in Ghana, as well as the political inclusion of Ghanaians living abroad.

Clifford Mpare, CEO of Frontline Capital a major sponsor of the summit said:

“We see this initiative as a potential shot-in-the-arm for the economy and future prosperity of this country at a time when there is much work to do. Work equates to opportunity whether in employment or business building and Ghana needs proven talent and a strong work ethic to create viable and competitive industries across a broad swathe of market sectors.”

Running parallel to the four-day summit will be an exhibition where companies, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), entrepreneurs and corporate bodies will demonstrate their support for the objectives of the event, as well as showcase employment opportunities and business projects which require special talent or resources that the diaspora may be able to provide.

The Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit is Chaired by entrepreneur Alex Dadey who heads-up a network of country groups around the world. With just eight weeks to go before the summit opening, Dadey spends much of his time raising funds from the private sector and so far has commitments from Standard Chartered Bank, Tullow Oil, Ghana Home Loans, Broll, Forewin, Zoomlion, Ghana Gas and a number of other organisations eager to align themselves with the summit’s objectives.

The event, which is partnered by Ghana Investment Promotion Centre, the Ministries of Foreign Affairs & Regional Integration, Business Development and the Diaspora Relations Office, will open at 7.30am at the International Conference Centre in Accra, Ghana on Wednesday 5 July with a welcome address given by President of The Republic of Ghana, H.E Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo to an expected audience of 500 eager diasporans seeking a new beginning at home.

Please click here to visit the site.

All photo’s taken curtesy of Ernest Simons Photography

Please visit the site http://www.ghanadiasporahs.org/ or email uk.gdhcs@gmail.com for more info

 

Twi classes in London brought to you by Ghana Union

Are you 16+ want to learn Twi? Then register now for Twi classes in North and South London. Both classes run for 12 week and its only £5 per lesson! What are you waiting for? Sign up now!

SOUTH LONDON

Starting Friday 5th May

Time: 6.30-8pm

Venue: Walworth Methodist Church (Clubland), 54 Camberwell Road, London, SE5 0EW

 

NORTH LONDON

Starting 6th May

Time: 11am-12.30pm

Venue: 12 Finspace, 225-229 Seven Sisters Road, Finsbury Park, London, N4 2DA

 

For any inquiries email starproject@ghanaunion.org.uk

 

 

Grab exclusive tickets to see Caroline, Or Change

A limited number of exclusive tickets for Caroline, Or Change at Chichester Festival are are available for The Voice readers only.

This Olivier Award-winning musical mixes blues, soul, Motown, classical music and Jewish folk songs to create a beautiful, uplifting and deeply moving portrait of America at a time of momentous social upheaval spurred by the civil rights movement.

Michael Longhurst, who recently directed an acclaimed revival of Amadeus at the National Theatre, directs Sharon D. Clarke in the title role. Equally renowned as a singer and actor, her Olivier Award-winning stage and screen work encompasses Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and The Amen Corner at the National Theatre, Ghost the Musical and We Will Rock You in the West End and Holby City on TV.

Tickets are subject to availability and valid for performances from 6 May-3 June 2017. See below for full details on how to accesst his special allocation.

HOW TO BOOK TICKETS:

Contact box office on 01243 781312 and quote CFTCC when booking, or visit www.cft.org uk and log in or create an account, then:

1. Select ‘TICKETS’ on the Caroline, Or Change web page 
2. Select ’16-25 TICKETS’ on one of the performance dates
3. Add the promotion code ‘CFTCC’  at the bottom of the page
4. The available seats will then appear as purple or yellow stars
5. Select the seats you’d like (maximum of two per customer)
6. Select ‘CONTINUE’ to proceed to payment

Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit: London Roadshow Event

As a member of the UK Diaspora Homecoming Summit committee, we are proud to invite you to attend the Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit London Road Show event taking place 13th May 2017

  • Date: Saturday 13th May 2017
  • Road Show Attendance Cost: FREE
  • Venue: Pestana Chelsea Bridge, SW8 4AE
  • Key Note Speaker: Minister of Information and Spokesperson for the Presidency – Mustapha Abdul-Hamid

This is a registration only event so please register as soon as possible to secure your place

Summit Registration: Click here to register for free today

(Registration is on a first come first served basis, so register ASAP to secure your place!)

The main summit is being organised in fulfillment of a manifesto pledge by H.E President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo Addo, President of the Republic of Ghana, to engage Ghanaians Living Abroad in the transformation of the political and socio-economic structure of Ghana.

The purpose of the Summit is to bring the Ghanaian Diaspora together to dialogue on how to achieve the President’s vision of active participation by Diasporans in the economic development of the country and to fully integrate them into the political processes.

The Summit also aims to attract the full participation of Ghanaians Living Abroad in Private Enterprise by bringing them together with local businesses.

KLM have come on board as the airline sponsor and offering up to 15% off flights for those attending conference. So anyone travelling to Ghana around this time can make use of that. CLICK HERE

Please visit: www.ghanadiasporahs.org to register and for more information

London Tech Week to Shine Spotlight on African Startups

The Africa Technology Business Network’s annual pitch competition Africa Tech Pitch LDN will be featured in London Tech Week 2017. Now in its third year, Africa Tech Pitch LDN provides an opportunity for Africa-focused tech startups to showcase their solutions to the London tech ecosystem. It spotlights high-impact, high-growth startups that are using technology to unlock untapped opportunities and address a real need in the African market.

In a bid to include startups who are unable to travel to London, this year’s search will be held as a three-minute video pitch competition allowing Africa-based innovators to submit their entries online for the first time.

A panel of industry judges will select five top startups to be highlighted and screened during London Tech Week (12th-16th June) at an exclusive reception hosted by TLA Africa, part of the Tech London Advocates – a coalition of over 4300 tech leaders, experts and investors in London.

The final tech pitch winner will be announced at the Africa Technology Business Forum in London on 21st June 2017 before an audience of innovators and investors from across Europe and Africa.

Startups can apply until 31st May – http://www.atbnforum.com/startup-showcase

A Servant of Rhythm From Ghana, in Texas

On the morning of the 20th annual African Cultural Festival at the University of North Texas here, Torgbui Midawo Gideon Foli Alorwoyie, the festival’s founder, was doing last-minute errands. There were drums to gather, programs to pick up from the printer, costumes to procure. For these annual events, he is his own promoter, his own publicist, his own street team.

“I do everything myself,” he explained from the driver’s seat of his minivan. Deep blue scars on his cheeks — marking him as a Midawo, or high priest, of the Ewe cult of Ghana’s Volta region — bent as he glanced between two different cellphones. A thick chain with a gold medallion in the shape of Africa glinted on his chest.

Mr. Alorwoyie leading a rehearsal at the University of North Texas in April. Credit Allison V. Smith for The New York Times

Mr. Alorwoyie (pronounced al-or-WO-yee), 71, is a rarity in American academia: a master drummer from Africa who is a tenured professor of African drumming and dance, disciplines that are difficult to categorize within Western musical theory. And in his own country, he is one of the few musicians working arduously to pass on traditions in danger of disappearing.

Mr. Alorwoyie also carries the title of Torgbui, or paramount chief, in his region of Ghana, responsible for administrative decisions and rulings on certain judgments; an herbalist (a large bottle of gin at his home, stuffed with long roots, was repeatedly offered to a visitor for its healing properties); and a stern taskmaster to his performers and students.

He has a key link to the evolution of American Minimalism: In 1970, the composer Steve Reich traveled to Ghana and studied with Mr. Alorwoyie for a month. “Drumming,” Mr. Reich’s groundbreaking piece for nine percussionists, was written after his trip.

At several rehearsals on the University of North Texas campus earlier this month, Mr. Alorwoyie guided a student drumming and dance ensemble that, for the festival concert, would be accompanied by five Ghanaian percussionists as well as Mr. Alorwoyie’s wife, Memunatu, 46, a former principal dancer in the Ghana Dance Ensemble in Accra; several former students who regularly return to dance at his events; and their daughter, Gloria, 11, who has been under her mother’s tutelage since birth.

Lither and quicker than many men half his age, Mr. Alorwoyie exuded a fierce calm during rehearsals. For many rhythms, he stood next to the atsimevu, a massive drum played with sticks. Tapping against its hull to establish a beat, Mr. Alorwoyie called drummers and dancers into action, activating changes in the patterns and movements with nods or shifts in expression. When not playing, he paced like a general, hands on his hips.

Some Ewe rhythms have a slippery, collapsing quality, an amorphous relationship to any easily recognizable downbeat. Mr. Alorwoyie’s lead patterns directed the dancers, but when another

Memunatu Gariba Alorwoyie, the former principal dancer of the Ghana Dance Ensemble, during a rehearsal with the University of North Texas student ensemble. Credit Allison V. Smith for The New York Times

drummer took over the atsimevu, Mr. Alorwoyie stepped into a dance with his wife; their playful steps around each other were like marital shadowboxing. As complex as the rhythmic patterns are, they go hand-in-hand with movement and song — the dancers and drummers serve one another.

“African music is not something you just listen to,” Mr. Alorwoyie said in an interview in his office, its walls covered in awards, degrees and newspaper articles about him dating back decades. “The answer is the dance.”

Mr. Alorwoyie left Ghana in 1976 and took a position as a visiting lecturer at SUNY College at Brockport. After stints at the American Conservatory of Music and the Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago, he joined the North Texas faculty in 1996. The School of Music there is one of the nation’s largest, with an extensive percussion program. According to John Scott, the chair of the search committee that hired him, Mr. Alorwoyie is the first — and still the only — tenured African drummer at an American university.

“The first year he was here, all of a sudden he says he needs money to buy cloth to make clothes for the ensemble, so they look like an African ensemble,” Mr. Scott said. “‘O.K., where are we going come up in the budget with clothes money for an ensemble?’ But you manage to do it.”

The rhythms Mr. Alorwoyie plays and teaches belong to a language that has been stored in generations of memory, rarely recorded or preserved. Ewe songs are forms of communication; in some cases, phrases like “the lion is coming” are reinterpreted as drum patterns, part of an alarm system that existed among villages. (Some songs, Mr. Alorwoyie says, routinely contained criticism of different families in a community.) Without a written history, traditional Ghanaian drumming (of which there are thousands of tiny variations) is part of a family of African song forms that don’t fit easily into Western pedagogical models.

Mr. Alorwoyie with the atsimevu, a tall drum that is used as a lead instrument in many Ghanaian songs and rhythms. Credit Allison V. Smith for The New York Times

“There was a time when ethnomusicology was in some places not really integrated into music programs,” Mr. Scott said. “It was sort of the bottom of the pecking order; there’s a whole strata of musicians who looked down on ethnomusicology and ethnic music: ‘Oh, we don’t want to deal with this, it’s not art music.’ Just like the people who looked down on jazz and said, ‘This is not real music.’”

Kobla Ladzekpo, who taught for 38 years at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Abraham Adzenyah, who was at Wesleyan University for 46, are both master drummers from Ghana who enjoyed strong support from their academic communities, but neither ever had a title above adjunct professor.

“African traditional performance arts have no conventional place in higher education schools of music or music conservatories,” said David Locke, the chair of the music department at Tufts University, who has known Mr. Alorwoyie for four decades and collaborated with him on a research project on the Ewe drum language that resulted in a 2013 book. “I wouldn’t necessarily think that bias is actually capturing that, it’s more of a historical condition that seems to make natural sense. On the other hand, there is a lot of prejudice and misunderstanding of African arts and performance arts and African ways of life.”

Without a notational system, the rhythms must be passed directly from generation to generation.

“There’s not a classroom that’s going to teach you,” Mr. Alorwoyie said. “In the villages and towns and cottages, you’re not going to see nobody teaching nobody how to drum.”

He and the performers he brought to Denton for the festival are part of the group trying to transmit this fragile knowledge. “It’s here,” said Godwin Abotsi, 37, a Ghanaian drummer and dancer who lives in Fort Collins, Colo., pointing to his head.

In December, Mr. Alorwoyie and several of his students traveled to New York for a performance of “Drumming” with the ensemble Mantra Percussion at National Sawdust, presented by World

Mr. Alorwoyie, center, dancing at National Sawdust in December 2016. Credit Stephen Speranza for The New York Times

Music Institute. The Ghanaian ensemble presented traditional compositions and dances, alternating with Mantra’s performances of works by Mr. Reich. For “Drumming,” the two groups played in tandem, with Mr. Reich’s piece fitting like a skin over a complex rhythmic skeleton led by Mr. Alorwoyie. The staggered bell pattern that anchors many Ghanaian rhythms became a beacon amid the phased bongo cycles of Mr. Reich’s composition — an indigenous form cradling a modern one. (Through a publicist, Mr. Reich declined to comment for this article.)

Even in Africa, the sacred songs and rhythms that Mr. Alorwoyie teaches are struggling, with the drummers and dancers of Ghana’s national ensemble earning salaries that barely sustain them. Hiplife, a form of popular music heavily influenced by reggae, has some strands of traditional drumming, but in general those traditions are not highly valued by younger people.

“It’s associated with the past, it’s associated with rural areas, you don’t make money from it,” Mr. Locke said of the traditional style. “You go to a funeral, and the D.J.s have their sound systems, and they’re blasting the music at very, very high volumes, and the traditional folk are playing their traditional drums right next to where the D.J.s are set up. It’s like the Industrial Revolution versus the preindustrial world.”

Mr. Alorwoyie Credit Allison V. Smith for The New York Times

Mr. Alorwoyie travels to Ghana several times a year to attend to affairs that concern his chieftaincy, but he also is attempting to pass his library of music on to people who can sustain it. Rather than update the old patterns, he said that at this point in his life, he must return to the rhythms he knows; history demands it.

“If I am trying to teach something else creatively,” he said, “I’m going to lose those very important messages.”

With this sense of reverence comes a teaching style in which anything less than what is expected is unacceptable. At a dress rehearsal for a festival performance, Mr. Alorwoyie gave a thorough dressing-down to both undergraduate students and veteran Ghanaian drummers.

“Why are you talking?” he asked sharply, after entering the backstage area and finding his dancers and drummers joking around at a moment when he wanted them to be entering for a procession.

The ensemble fell silent. Mr. Alorwoyie — who is said to have been born with his fists curled tightly, marking him for life as a servant of rhythm — led them onstage, his body bouncing lightly to the beat of the squeeze drum under his arm, his eyes fixed intensely upon his charges.

Article via The New York Times

Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to take part in WHO malaria vaccine pilot programme

The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO) announced today that Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi will take part in a WHO-coordinated pilot implementation programme that will make the world’s first malaria vaccine available in selected areas, beginning in 2018.

The injectable vaccine, RTS,S, was developed to protect young children from the most deadly form of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. RTS,S will be assessed in the pilot programme as a complementary malaria control tool that could potentially be added to the core package of WHO-recommended measures for malaria prevention.

“The prospect of a malaria vaccine is great news. Information gathered in the pilot will help us make decisions on the wider use of this vaccine”, said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa. “Combined with existing malaria interventions, such a vaccine would have the potential to save tens of thousands of lives in Africa,” she added.

Africa bears the greatest burden of malaria worldwide. Global efforts in the last 15 years have led to a 62 percent reduction in malaria deaths between 2000 and 2015, yet approximately 429,000 people died of the disease in 2015, the majority of them young children in Africa.

The WHO pilot programme will assess whether the vaccine’s protective effect in children aged 5 – 17 months old during Phase III testing can be replicated in real-life. Specifically, the pilot programme will assess the feasibility of delivering the required four doses of RTS,S, the vaccine’s potential role in reducing childhood deaths, and its safety in the context of routine use.

WHO recommendations and RTS,S

RTS,S was developed by GSK and is the first malaria vaccine to have successfully completed a Phase III clinical trial. The trial was conducted between 2009 and 2014 through a partnership involving GSK, the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), and a network of African research sites in seven African countries—including Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi.

RTS,S is also the first malaria vaccine to have obtained a positive scientific opinion from a stringent medicines regulatory authority, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), which approved RTS,S in July 2015.

In October 2015, two independent WHO advisory groups, comprised of the world’s foremost experts on vaccines and malaria, recommended pilot implementation of RTS,S in three to five settings in sub-Saharan Africa. The recommendation came from the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization and the Malaria Policy Advisory Committee (MPAC), following a joint review of all available evidence on the vaccine’s safety and efficacy. The World Health Organization formally adopted the recommendation in January 2016.

Pilot implementation

The three countries were selected to participate in the pilot based on the following criteria: high coverage of long-lasting insecticidal-treated nets (LLINs); well-functioning malaria and immunisation programmes, a high malaria burden even after scale-up of LLINs, and participation in the Phase III RTS,S malaria vaccine trial. Each of the three countries will decide on the districts and regions to be included in the pilots. High malaria burden areas will be prioritized, as this is where the benefit of the vaccine is predicted to be highest. Information garnered from the pilot will help to inform later decisions about potential wider use of the vaccine.

The malaria vaccine will be administered via intramuscular injection and delivered through the routine national immunization programmes. WHO is working with the three countries to facilitate regulatory authorization of the vaccine for use in the pilots through the African Vaccine Regulatory Forum (AVAREF). Regulatory support will also include measures to enable the appropriate safety monitoring of the vaccine and rigorous evaluation for eventual large scale use.

Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and UNITAID, are partnering to provide US$49.2 million for the first phase of the pilot programme (2017-2020) which will be complemented by in-kind contributions from WHO and GSK.

Articel via ReliefWeb