Category: News


Africa has entered the space race, with Ghana’s first satellite now orbiting earth

The GhanaSat-1―Ghana’s first satellite―began its orbit recently, with a little help from some friends.

The cubesat, built by a Ghanaian engineering team at All Nations University, was delivered to NASA’s International Space Station in June on a SpaceX rocket that took off from pad 39a at Kennedy Space Center, a NASA spokesperson confirmed.

The GhanaSat-1 deployed into orbit from the Center in July, and is now operational, according to project manager Richard Damoah, a Ghanaian professor and assistant research scientist at NASA.

“This particular satellite has two missions,” Damoah told TechCrunch. “It has cameras on board for detailed monitoring of the coastlines of Ghana. Then there’s an educational piece―we want to use it to integrate satellite technology into high school curriculum,” he said.

GhanaSat-1 will send a signal to a ground station at All Nations University’s Space Systems and Technology Laboratory. That’s where it was developed by a team of engineers that included Benjamin BonsuErnest Teye Matey, and Joseph Quansah. 

While Ghana’s president Nana Akufo-Addo applauded the launch and congratulated the team directly, the project did not receive official Ghanaian government support, according to Damoah. Instead, Japan’s national space agency, JAXA, provided the bulk of the resources and training to develop the satellite.

The GhanaSat-1 deployment marks increased interest and activity in Africa toward space exploration.  Nigeria’s first cubesat launched on the same SpaceX mission. “Several nations, such as South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya and Ethiopia have space agencies. Angola announced its intention to launch a satellite over the coming year,” said Elsie Kanza, Head of Africa at the World Economic Forum.

She also pointed to Pan-African efforts to coordinate space efforts, such as the African Union’s African Space Policy and Strategy initiative―adopted last year―that prompted AU members states  “to realize an African Outer space Programme, as one of the flagship programmes….of the AU Agenda.”

Damoah believes the GhanaSat-1 deployment could prompt Ghanaian government  resources toward a second satellite project coordinated by All Nations University and the country’s Science Space and Technology Center. “After this launch, we now have the support of the president and cabinet support,” he said. “We are looking to develop a GhanaSat-2, with high resolution cameras, that could monitor things such as illegal mining, water use, and deforestation in the country.”

Article via TechCrunch

VOICE EXCLUSIVE: Get 2 for 1 tickets to Jamaica House 2017!

The Voice is offering readers an exclusive 2 for 1 offer for tickets to Jamaica House 2017 at the o2 in London.

The much-anticipated Jamaica House 2017 starts tomorrow at the o2 and runs until August 13. Performers include Freddie McGregor, Ziggy Marley, Luciano, OMI, Nesbeth, Protégé and more.

The races will be shown on the big-screen, so you won’t miss Usain Bolt and other Jamaican athletes as they compete at the IAAF World Championships.

View the Jamaica House 2017 promotional video here -https://youtu.be/J-99HzNWvvk

Click the link below to get this exclusive Voice offer of 2 for 1 tickets to any of the Jamaica House 2017 shows from August 5-13. To take advantage of the offer, book your tickets anytime between now and this Sunday August 6, 2017 at 12 midnight GMT

August 8 Tickets 
August 11 Tickets 

GHANA – A NATION IN RETROSPECTIVE, FRIDAY 4 AUGUST, 18.00 – 21.45, VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM

This Friday the V&A Museum invites you to a special event..  ‘Ghana – A Nation in Retrospective’ with a welcome and opening address at 18.00 by Lord Boateng of Akyem and Wembley.

Historians, cultural theorists, scholars, museum curators, artists and performers of the diaspora, will look retrospectively at a nation that over the last 60 years has shaped a modern vision, and established Ghanaians as trend-setting ‘Afropolitans’.

Join them to review and re-contextualise your history, heritage, culture and future by exploring Ashanti Goldweights & Regalia(1874); William Ansah Sessarakoo (1736 – 1770); kings, family and colonialism in Keta (mid 1880s – mid 20th century); women, cloth & culture; the story of Pan-Africanism (late 1700s – 1963); an immersive simulation of Nkrumah’s WE MUST UNITE NOW OR PERISH (1963); a re-discovery of heritage through food; pop-up photo salon; soulful rock, and DJs with an Independence soundtrack.

Date: Friday, 4 August 2017

Time: 18.00 – 21.45

Venue: Sackler Centre Reception, V&A Museum

Ticket price: £3.00 – £5.00

For More information and to book Tickets visit – https://www.vam.ac.uk/event/1KWB4x8a/ghana-a-nation-in-retrospective-aug-2017

Join the Future of Ghana Research Study

Research Survey…

Future of Ghana Ltd are pleased to announce our research survey aimed at the 2nd generation British Ghanaian demographic is now live on futureofghana.com. The survey follows a pre-survey released last month undertaken to give us a better sense of our potential data and refine our research.

This survey forms part of a wider research study (to include focus groups and interviews) on the ways in which the 2nd generation British Ghanaian engages with Ghana, why they do so and how they would like to. At the same time building up a profile of who the 2nd generation actually are.  

The findings will be published in a report in time for Independence Day next year.

 

Why?…

The purpose of the study is to explore the ways in which diaspora groups interact with their ‘home’ countries.  As stated the focus of this study is 2nd generation Ghanaians in the UK, how they engage with/desire to engage with Ghana (i.e. through social, cultural, economic/financial and skills channels) and its implications for diaspora engagement efforts, policies and development.

The study will attempt to understand the underlying factors driving engagement with Ghana, the priorities and patterns of 2nd generation engagement (in comparison to 1st generation) and what, if any, barriers to engagement exist. We are intent on ensuring your collective voices are represented, which we hope will help shape policy, add to the dialogue around the diaspora and contribute to Ghana’s diaspora engagement efforts.

 

Who?…

We are inviting all 2nd generation British Ghanaians who resides in the UK aged 18 years old and above to participate in this study by taking the survey.
For the purposes of this study, 2nd generation British Ghanaian is being defined as:

  • UK born children of at least 1 Ghanaian born parent
  • Ghanaian born children of at least 1 Ghanaian parent who emigrated to the UK before primary school age (5 years old) and settled here.

 

Results..

The results of the survey will be analysed with data collected from focus group discussions and interviews and used towards a research report to be published by Future of Ghana Ltd.

The final report will be completed by March 2018, and we will be sharing the report with all participants. It will be formally launched at an event in mid-2018.
For more information on the study visit our website and you can take the survey here.

Is This the Woman Who Will Save Uber?

A little over a year before Bozoma Saint John became the first chief brand officer at Uber, the transportation company’s best hope to rehabilitate its tarnished image, she hailed a ride from the Four Seasons hotel in Austin, Tex., to a nearby business dinner. What pulled up was a wreck.

“Hey, nothing’s going to happen to me in this car, right?” Ms. Saint John said half-jokingly to the driver. “You can drive, right?”

She expected him to banter back. Instead, he told her that a group of taxi drivers at the airport had vandalized the vehicle and that he needed the money from this ride to fix it. He also mentioned that he had been saving to see Iggy Pop, his late brother’s favorite rocker, at the South by Southwest festival, which Ms. Saint John was attending as the head of global consumer marketing for iTunes and Apple Music.

She gasped. Her dinner was with Iggy Pop. Would the driver, perhaps, like to come along?

Cue the tears (and the five-star passenger rating).

“Everybody was like: ‘What’s happening? Is this your date? I don’t understand. Why is this guy here?’” Ms. Saint John said. “It was such a beautiful, human moment,” one that was chronicled on her Instagram account, @badassboz, where she has more than 40,000 followers.

“We’re all rushing in our lives, and I was so concerned with getting from here to there, and if not for the moment of humanity where we just started talking, that connection would not have happened,” she said. “What a miss that would have been. What a miss!”

This story was part of what convinced Arianna Huffington, a founder of The Huffington Post and a high-profile member of Uber’s board, that Ms. Saint John was the right person to shepherd Uber out of its recent thicket of legal and ethical scandals.

She moved to New York, and through a temp agency got gigs as a catering server and a receptionist for an Upper East Side dog-washing salon. She also began going to nightclubs, where she made friends with influencers like Rene Mclean, who ran a D.J. boot camp. Her temp agency sent her to SpikeDDB, Spike Lee’s advertising firm. Mr. Lee had fired his assistant and wanted someone to answer phones while he looked for a new one.

“She walked in, she got the job,” he said. “It was evident that she was going to go places.”

Ms. Saint John went from making coffee runs to helping Mr. Lee brainstorm campaigns, like casting Beyoncé, who had just left Destiny’s Child, as Carmen in a Pepsi commercial.

“That became the turning point where, O.K., I can actually use my knowledge of pop culture, running around these streets with my friends, knowing the inside track on things, to help inform business decisions,” she said. She also met her husband-to-be, an advertising executive, in the company cafeteria.

After a stint selling smoking cessation products for GlaxoSmithKline, Ms. Saint John took a marketing job at Pepsi, coming up with projects like the “Pepsi DJ Division,” which included D.J. Khaled.

In 2013, she orchestrated the halftime show Pepsi sponsored at the Super Bowl featuring Beyoncé. Four months later, her husband’s illness was diagnosed. Their daughter had just turned 4.

“Towards the end of his life, as everything started to fail, he was very adamant that I not stop what I was doing,” Ms. Saint John said. “He was telling me to hold his hands because he couldn’t grasp anymore, saying, ‘Promise me, you’re going to keep going.’”

On the 13th anniversary of their first date, Ms. Saint John posted a status update on Facebook, saying in part, “we reflect over our years together as he has a chemo cocktail and I drink red wine in a paper cup.” Mr. Saint John died in December 2013. Ms. Saint John, true to her word, kept going. In February 2014, Jimmy Iovine, a founder of Interscope Records, found out she was in Los Angeles for a sister’s wedding and requested a meeting at his house in Malibu. He had just started Beats Music, a streaming service, with her teenage idol, Dr. Dre. Who was Mr. Iovine? How did streaming work? She wasn’t quite sure, but she drove to the beachside residence.

“We ended up talking for four hours,” Ms. Saint John said. “I was raw. I needed something to give me some hope for the future. I needed something that could help me see further. When he was talking about all this newfangled stuff, I said: ‘That sounds like the future! I’m going to the future!’”

Ms. Saint John quit Pepsi and moved to Los Angeles as the head of global marketing for Beats. Her role expanded when Apple acquired Beats for $3 billion in 2014, and she came up with popular ad campaigns for Apple Music, like a 2015 commercial in which Mary J. Blige, Kerry Washington and Taraji P. Henson bond over post-breakup songs in a light and palm-frond-filled mansion (“Siri, play ‘I Will Survive,’” Ms. Washington says). Last year, Ms. Saint John walked on stage at Apple’s developers’ conference — the first black woman to do so — blasting old-school rap and commanding the room of mostly white men to bounce to the beat.Wired wondered, “Who the hell is this badass woman, and how did Apple keep her secret for so long?”

After hearing Ms. Saint John’s story of her Austin ride, “I had a flash — ‘Wow, she’d be great at Uber,’” Ms. Huffington said. “I thought she would be a great person to tell these amazing stories of our drivers, to touch people’s hearts, to bring more humanity to the brand.”

In May, Ms. Saint John and Travis Kalanick, an Uber founder and then chief executive, spent eight hours at Ms. Huffington’s home in Los Angeles, discussing what she might do for the company, both grand and simple.

“I think I might need to wear a disguise, but I want to drive,” she said. “What happens when someone gets in the car and they’re upset? Is that a moment? Do you just stay quiet or do you talk?”

Mr. Kalanick would step down as chief executive a month later. The hunt is on for his successor. But whoever it is will have Ms. Saint John helping steer from the passenger seat, stilettos and speakers on.

Source: www.nytimes.com

WHY I CHOSE GERMANY OVER GHANA, HENRICHS REVEALS

The Bayer Leverkusen full-back sheds light on pledging his international allegiance to Die Mannschaft over the Black Stars

Germany youngster Benjamin Henrichs has lifted the lid on his decision to commit his international future to the 2014 world champions ahead of Ghana. Born to a German father and a Ghanaian mother in Bocholt, the Bayer Leverkusen right-back made two appearances as Joachim Low’s outfit beat Chile to win the 2017 Fifa Confederations Cup in Russia. He made his debut for Die Mannschaft in an 8-0 triumph over San Marino in November last year.

“Germany asked me at the age of 14 to play for their under-15 national team and I didn’t hear anything from Ghana until now,” Henrichs, who is currently on holiday in Ghana, told Atinka TV. Actually, I thought about it [playing for Ghana], maybe at the beginning, because I saw players like [Michael] Essien playing for Ghana [and] because they were like idols for me. But they [Ghana] never asked and I didn’t think about it anymore. So, when Germany asked, it was clear that I would play for Germany.”

Henrichs’ Germany involvement was down to an outstanding show in Bundesliga last season. In only his second campaign of professional football, the 20-year-old made 29 league appearances, involving 27 starts, as Leverkusen finished 12.

He also made seven outings, involving six starts, in the Champions League.

“I was just playing football at the beginning, so at the age of 11, 12, I didn’t think about playing for Germany or Ghana. Then Germany asked me and why should I say no when this was the only offer I got. That’s why I chose Germany. My mum wanted me to play for Ghana but I think she’s not sad that I’m playing for Germany now. I think she’s still happy.”

 

Bridget Gives @ 27 – donate today to help provide health insurance to the village of Ohua!

Bridget’s story

In her first 2 weeks of being 27, Bridget Boakye is fundraising $2,000 through family, friends, readers, and network in the U.S. and around the world to bring health insurance to the village of OHUA, in the Gamoa district in Ghana, for two years. She also hopes to raise awareness about Crowdfrica.org, its mission and impact, and help the team continue to broaden the reach of their work. With a $5 donation, you can help make her birthday wish of raising $2,000 and providing health insurance to the OHUA village come true.

ABOUT OHUA & IMPACT

OHUA is a small remote and isolated farming village located in the Gomoa district, central region, Ghana.  The beautiful people in the community are hard working and believe in good health and Education. Parents especially, work hard to make sure their children go to school even though most of them had no formal education.

The biggest problem Ohua is facing is access to healthcare. There is no health center in the community and the one they can visit is far away. This makes access to healthcare nearly impossible and very expensive for them and deprive a lot from seeking care when sick.

Bridget’s birthday will fund health insurance for 200 people (children and adults) which includes all junior high school children, form 1,2, 3 and a number families in OHUA for two years.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO DONATE!!!

Dentaa Amoateng MBE Honoured with Diaspora Mobilization Award

GUBA CEO and founder, Dentaa Amoateng MBE was honoured with the Exemplary Leadership in Diaspora Mobilization Award at the Ghana Homecoming Summit Committee on Saturday the 8th of July 2017.  The awards which took place at the Kempinski Hotel (Ghana), comes as an acknowledgement of Industries and individuals aiding in the provision of services and support to Ghanaians in the Diaspora.

Presenting the award was the Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection – Madam Otiko Afisah Djabah. In her acceptance, Mrs Amoateng MBE called for the need for unity amongst Ghanaians:

“We need to build trust and eschew the negative tendencies which work against our interests and progress as a people. We see businesses that start well and just when everyone is hailing the success story they allow pettiness and trivial issues to destroy an otherwise successful business. We can work together to build very successful businesses here in Ghana, here in Africa. So let us seize the moment and build a better future for ourselves and the next generation.” – She adds.

In attendance was the President and First Lady of the Republic of Ghana, His Excellency Nana Akufo-Addo and Mrs Rebecca Akufo-Addo, Vice President and Second Lady Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia and Mrs Samira Bawumia, amongst various Ghanaian dignitaries.

The award was part of the Ghana Homecoming Summit Committee’s Excellence in Ghana Diaspora Mobilization Award series.

Ghana Diaspora HomeComing Summit 2017 – Day 2 Round Up

Here’s a round of what took place on day two of the Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit:

  • The theme was the Human Resource Marketplace and addressed wide ranging issues from converting the ‘brain drain’ to ‘brain gain’, how tertiary institutions and industry can collaborate to reduce the skills gap, how institutions such as the International Organization for Migration (IOM) have been mobilising diaspora groups in Ghana for over 30 years and addressing how we can develop a more productive and efficient work ethic.
  • After Mr. Alex Dadey, Chairman of the Summit Planning Committee, made a brief address to the audience and recapped an overview of Day 1’s activities Hon. Robert Ahomka-Lindsay, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry gave a strong call to action calling on diasporans to not just point out challenges but to also be part of the solution in an active and impactful way. Drawing on his own experiences in the Diaspora he called on the diaspora to be realistic, manage expectations and to use the same level of resilience used to survive in their new host countries in Ghana. He also shared several points which he called Home Truths to encourage the diaspora to engage differently in order to bring cohesion and more collaborative partnerships with Ghanaian locals.
  • Hon. Ignatius Bafuor Awuah MP, Minister for Employment and Labour Relations followed, giving an overview of Ghanaian employment statistics (youth employment is estimated at 12-24%) and the experiences of Ghanaians abroad, particularly in the Gulf and called for Ghanaians to contribute to the national economy where protections and regulations seek to safeguard its workers.
  • Princess Naa Ocansey, MD of SOS Labour Ghana Limited began with a rousing call for diasporans to come home saying as “Uncle Sam needs Americans, Uncle Nana Addo needs you!” She encouraged and promoted the idea of circular legal migration which involves working in Ghana for short periods of time (e.g. 6 weeks, 6 months or even a year) and returning to host country. Deemed a “triple win” with host, home and the diasporan in question benefitting from circular migration, Princess Naa announced the development of a Diasporan National Service which SOS Labour Ghana Ltd, amongst others are developing. Key to its creation was the idea that second generation diasporans are often not involved or included and do not have the same networks or connections as their parents.
  • Sylvia Lopez-Ekra of IOM Ghana discussed the Connecting the Diaspora for Development (CD4D) programme which is aimed at harnessing skills transfer in many countries including Ghana through its diaspora, particularly in the agriculture and health sector. Ms. Lopez-Ekra also mentioned that Ghana remains a strong example of diaspora engagement and is regularly used as a reference point for the diaspora agenda. It was also emphasised that more needs to be done to integrate second-generation Ghanaians abroad who may not have citizenship but are doing wonderful things to celebrate the name of Ghana.
  • Ms. Josephine Nkrumah, Chairperson of the National Commission for Civic Education called on us to not conform to the systems that do not work but to bring change to Ghana. Ms. Nkrumah focused on the need to move from an unproductive work ethic common in Ghana to one of discipline, accountability, integrity and excellence.
  • Mrs. Ellen Hagan, MD of L’AINE focused on bridging the skills gap of youth relative to universities and industry. She called on us to be innovative and to have an entrepreneurial mind to identify gaps and assess whether these gaps can be converted into an opportunity to grow and create employment and build skills.
  • Mr. George Asomaning introduced us all to DENI – Direct Expatriate Nationals Investment, a financial instrument which allows all Ghanaians regardless of location to invest. There is no minimum investment and similar to other stocks and financial products pays a dividend based on performance. He encouraged all of us to get involved as it launches. (Date not given)
  • Mr. Hayford Atta-Krufi, CEO of the National Pensions Regulatory Authority (NPRA) discussed the eligibility and security for all diasporans in terms of retirement schemes and pensions. He highlighted that it is very simple to transfer pensions from abroad to Ghana (a formal letter to the NPRA has to be written to begin to process) and is working with the Diaspora Relations Office to make this information more readily available.
  • Dr. Thomas Mensah, a pioneer in fibre optic technology joined us via live stream and presented on new plans for infrastructure projects including Kumasi Airport and a new railway system.
  • A new Diaspora Engagement Policy is being drafted and under consultation but will be launched soon. (Date not given)
  • After workshops on the Diaspora Investment Experience, Technical Capacity Building of Entrepreneurs, Practical Application of DENI and Entry into the Oil & Gas Sector. A presentation on the Marine Drive Investment project slated to change the landscape of Accra through tourism was given by the Office of Tourism, Creative Arts and Culture. 
  • Wogbejeke, a theatre production by the Bambu Centre tracing the history of Ghana from pre-colonial times until now gave a performance.
Audience questions (asked throughout the day)
  • How does the government intend to involve and empower the voices of those who are are not rich and are not elite in the Diaspora?
  • How is the Diaspora National Service programme being created? Who is being consulted?
  • Does age impact if you can work in government?
  • Why do non-Ghanaian expatriates receive better salary, packages and are generally more valued than Ghanaians from abroad with similar or more qualifications?
  • How feasible will the economies of the factories in the ODOF policy be?
  • What kind of support is being given to technology companies who want to support the ODOF policy?
  • How is the Diaspora being defined?
  • What diplomatic repercussions have their been for governments in the Gulf where Ghanaians are maltreated?
  • How can tertiary institutions and industry bridge the skills gap?
  • What is being done to change the ‘poor’ Ghanaian work ethic that was spoken about?
  • Why are foreign institutions such as NASA tell us as Ghanaians what is and isn’t possible?
  • If we move towards big tourism projects are we destroying local value and moving people from their homes?
  • If you’re investing into tourism, how are you attracting people to actually come and visit Ghana?

Ghana Diaspora HomeComing Summit 2017 – Day 1 Round Up

The Ghana Diaspora Homecoming Summit is a conference organized by the government of Ghana to establish relationships with the diaspora community.  The summit which started yesterday aims to harness capital for development purposes by encouraging Ghanaians abroad to invest in Ghana.

Below is a highlight of what took place yesterday:

  • Yesterday’s agenda was an entrepreneurial Ghana and focused on its economic transformation and the role the diaspora plays in that. From talks from Hon. Ken Ofori-Atta, Minister of Finance to Mr Yofi Grant of GIPC, there was a strong focus on the financial opportunities Ghana presents and the already established financial contribution of diasporans (through remittances which according to Mr Grant are greater than foreign direct investment (FDI)).
  • After the national anthem and an opening prayer, Mr. Alex Dadey, Chairman of the Summit Planning Committee ushered in Day 1 of the Summit by welcoming guests and emphasising the human and financial capital the diaspora brings along with experience and exposure to different ideas and perspectives. 
  • Mr. Dadey also made several humble requests of H.E. President Nana Addo Akufo-Addo in his welcome address. This included reviewing laws and policies which restrict diaspora participation and inclusion including ROPAA. He also asked that the GDHS become institutionalised allowing for a more frequent and fruitful dialogue.
  • Tuga performed the #GDHS17’s theme song live
  • H.E. President Nana Addo Akufo-Addo emphasised the importance he places on the diaspora and their full inclusion to move Ghana forward. He also highlighted that the accountability of his government extends to Ghanaians overseas as well as those in country and that the Diaspora Relations Office will be crucial in facilitating this. He then stressed the importance of all Ghanaians having a stake in the country’s development in order to move the country beyond aid.
  • A number of talks addressed some of the realities of doing business in Ghana, the opportunities, challenges, bottlenecks, public-private partnerships (PPPs), frameworks and policy. Speakers included Mr. Djabarnor Narh, partner at EY Ghana and Mr. David Ofosu-Dortey of AB & David
  • Rahul Gopinath of ECOM Agrotrade Ltd spoke about the changing face of entrepreneurship in Ghana and what that looks like today. According to Rahul, Ghanaian entrepreneurs needs 4 things: knowledge, mentor-ship, capital and enabling government policy.
  • Mr. Phillip Sowah spoke about institutional frameworks bring used to drive growth in capital markets and highlighted the key need to truly understand how much money Ghanaians abroad send and for what reasons. He argued that once we understand who, what and why, then financial instruments and other enabling policies can be designed to truly fit the diaspora’s needs.
  • Mr Yofi Grant – Ghana’s GDP growth is estimated at 7%+ next year.
  • GIPC has created a digital map highlighting the business opportunities across the 10 regions which will go online soon (no date given but shown in the PPT).
  • A study by EY shows that Ghana is ranked 4th for doing business in Africa and 1st in West Africa but the government intends on doing enacting business reforms including making processes digital. The aim is make Ghana the most business friendly place in Africa.
  • Hon. Alan Kyeremateng addressed the delegation honing in on remarks made earlier in the day by Hon. Ken Ofori Atta (amongst other speakers) about moving Ghana from a taxation economy to a production economy and spoke about moving Ghana from a economy exporting raw materials to creating production lines to increase the value of our exports substantially. He spoke specifically of steel and iron which would strengthen the construction industry and increase our competitiveness.
  • As Ghana has a think export base, the government intends to address that through industrialisation looking to China as an example.
  • Lots of interesting questions from the audience including the perceived hostility from Ghanaian nationals to those from abroad, the capacity of the energy sector, creating more efficiency at the ports, lack of information sharing and clear channels to learn more about opportunities in Ghana.
  • Government is keen to build a comprehensive database to understand where diasporans are located, their skills sets and how they can be utilised fruitfully.

Mefiri Ghana will keep you updated on the rest of the conference