Author: admin_dev


My Improbable Graduation: From A Tiny Village In Ghana To Johns Hopkins

When I was about 5 years old, my father passed away and life took a dramatic turn. My uncles from my father’s side took all his properties, per the custom in my village in Ghana, so each of my father’s seven wives had to find ways to provide and take care of their children. My mother struggled to get enough food — mainly beans and vegetables — to make even one daily meal for myself and my six siblings. She would make our food as spicy as possible so that we would have to drink a lot and fill our stomachs with water.

But during these difficult years when I was in primary school and junior high, my mother always made sure I went to school.

Primary and secondary school are not free in Ghana. At the beginning of each school term, my mother asked the headmaster if I could start classes while she tried to get money to pay the fees. I still remember one time, when I was 7 or 8, the school authorities got tired of her excuses and kicked me out of school.

The next day, Mom took her most precious clothing and traditional beads, which she had hidden in a trunk, and sold them for less than half their value. She used the money to pay my school fees. It was only about $10. It doesn’t sound like much, but that was a lot of money in that time.

I was confused. Why hadn’t she sold her belongings months ago to buy food for us? Her unselfish act made me regard education as a necessity.

Mwinnyaa, at 2 or 3 years old, grew up in a village in Ghana. Courtsey of George Mwinnyaa

My mother’s sacrifice has been my anchor and source of strength ever since. My mom knew — and I later recognized — that education is more important than food. As a child, I realized that all the people in the village who could provide good food, school uniforms, books and shoes for their children had some form of education. I knew from that point that I could change my destiny if only I was able to succeed in school.

I completed high school, but it was nothing like high school in the United States. I never saw a computer. My school had no electricity; it had no library, gymnasium or cafeteria. I was picked on and beaten up by the other kids because I could not afford a school uniform.

In my senior year, my classmates and I had to take the final national exams that determine whether we could attend college. We knew even before starting the test that most of us would fail because our schools didn’t have the staff and resources to teach us properly. Out of over 200 classmates, I was one of only seven who passed all seven subjects. But none of us earned scores high enough for admission to the public universities in Ghana. Still, to our classmates, we were heroes just for passing.

What would I do next?

During high school, I had served as a community health volunteer through the Ghana Health Service. I did receive money for my work, but that was not the only reward. As a volunteer, I carried vaccines to rural villages, sometimes walking for miles to deliver them. I felt satisfaction and joy as I administered the oral vaccines to infants and children, knowing that they would be protected from diseases that had killed many children.

But I wanted to be able to administer injectable vaccines. I wanted to help provide checkups and counseling for pregnant women. I wanted to be able to organize better preventive health services in these villages.

Even though I could not get into any university, I was able to qualify for a community health worker certificate program. It took two years to complete and was quite an intensive program.

I hoped that becoming a community health worker would help me achieve what I could not as a

In 2003, Mwinnyaa was a junior high school student. “I didn’t have a school uniform, and the shorts I was wearing had two big holes at the back,” he remembers. “That is why I wore the oversize jacket, even though the weather was hot, to cover the holes.”
Courtesy of George Mwinnyaa

volunteer, but I soon realized that the care I could provide was not enough. I spent some time working with a medical team from Canada that visited remote villages, and I was amazed at the level of interaction with patients. They tried to explain a person’s condition, whether drugs would help or not, and more. I vowed that if I ever got the opportunity to continue my medical education, it would be in Canada.

I asked a Peace Corps volunteer I had met to help me prepare a resume so I could apply for school. Little did I suspect that a year later, we would be married. After her two years of service, we moved to the United States derailing my Canada plans.

Education in America

We moved to Nevada. I got a job as a custodian in an elementary school and tried to enroll in a university, but the school wanted my high school transcripts. They were impossible to get. High schools in Ghana don’t keep transcripts, just final exam results. I finally found one small community college that offered a placement test in lieu of high school transcripts.

This was a turning point. I felt I had another chance to change my destiny.

I was nervous as I started classes in January 2014. I considered myself to be the weakest academically among all the students. In the elementary school where I worked, I saw that all the students had laptops. How could I compete with these American students? I was fully discouraged. I felt that if any of these students studied for two hours, I would have to put in three times that effort to master the same material.

When I got my midterm exams and papers back, I first thought, “Oh, the professor has made a mistake; this cannot be my test score.”

My scores were 95 percent, even 100 percent.

After my first semester, I transferred to a larger community college and continued to perform well. For the first time, I felt as if I was free from the limitations imposed on me by the environment and circumstances in which I grew up.

Mwinnyaa met the woman who would become his wife, Leslie, in Ghana when she was a Peace Corps volunteer.
Family photo courtesy of George Mwinnyaa

My next plan was to transfer to the local university to complete my undergraduate studies. But then I found out about a scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation for community college students transferring to a four-year university. This scholarship encouraged its applicants to apply to top schools in their field of interest. For me, that was public health — and Johns Hopkins University.

I didn’t believe I had a chance in a million of being accepted into such a school, so I applied to another school known for its public health program: the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. I was accepted by both schools but did not get the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation scholarship. So Hopkins and North Carolina were out. I would instead go to the local university where I would get in-state tuition and a partial scholarship. My plan was to continue working as a custodian to help pay the bills.

But there was an unexpected twist. About a week after I was admitted to Hopkins and the University of North Carolina, both schools offered me a full scholarship. The door of opportunity opened again.

Still, I was afraid. I feared leaving behind my first American friends, my first American home, to go to a new place where nobody knew me.

I began school on Aug. 15, 2015. Last month, I graduated from Johns Hopkins University with a Bachelor of Arts in public health studies.

May 24, 2017, was the end of a long journey yet the beginning of a new chapter full of promises, difficult questions and deliberations. As I heard my name and began to walk across the stage, I wondered: How is this possible? In Ghana, I was not qualified to attend even a two-year college, yet here I am walking across the stage, graduating with honors, shaking the hand of the president of Johns Hopkins University.

I briefly thought: Maybe this is one of those good dreams that I will soon wake up from.

In America, I have learned, dreams can turn into an unexpected reality.

George Mwinnyaa, now 29, lives in Baltimore with his wife and 2-year-old son. He plans to start a master’s program at the Bloomberg School of Public Health this fall.

Article via NPR

Speakers Announced: Pan-African Women Forum #Changing Our Story

Face2face Africa invites you to the anticipated Pan-African Women Forum, the official kick-off event to the 2017 Pan-African Weekend

Come spend a sensational and memorable evening with powerful, trailblazing women of African descent from various industries as they share their inspirational journeys and important life and business lessons that will inspire and invigorate your life.

The forum will present two riveting panel discussions featuring women in business, technology, fashion, media, and more, followed by a Q&A session.

Featured Speakers 

Fumbi Chima, Chief Information Officer Burberry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lucy Quist, Managing Director
Airtel Ghana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ama K. Abebrese, Award-Winning Actress
“Beast of No Nation”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adenah Bayoh, Entrepreneur and Real-Estate Developer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abrima Erwiah,
Co-founder & President
Studio 189

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mushiya Tshikuka,
Entrepreneur & TV Personality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Speakers:

Dana Reed, CEO, The Africa Center
Uchente Emuleomo, VP of Corporate Counsel, Prudential

Cheryl Wills, TV Anchor, NY1
Chiney Ogwumike, WNBA Player
Wendy Osefo, Professor and Political Commentator
Mimi Plange, Fashion Designer
You can register for the event here

The National Diversity Awards 2017 – TWO WEEKS TO GO UNTIL NOMINATIONS & VOTING CLOSES!!!

In two weeks time nominations and voting will close for The National Diversity Awards 2017! An astonishing 14,000 people have taken the time to tell us about the life changing work being carried out by local heroes and community groups.

Voting closes on Friday 09th June – Why wait? Submit an entry today!

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A NOMINATION

How to submit a vote?

Our interactive nomination site allows you to view latest nominees, submit a new nomination, view our nomination map and vote for existing nominees!

To make a new nomination, simply select the award category you wish to nominate for, enter the details required and submit!

To vote to for an existing nominee, enter their name into the ‘search for nominee by name’ section. Our site will then present a selection of suggested profiles for you to choose from. Once you have found the profile you are looking for, enter your reason for voting and submit.

Tickets are now on sale for The National Diversity Awards!!!

Join us for the most spectacular celebration of diversity on Friday 08th September in the fantastic city of Liverpool. The breathtaking Anglican Cathedral will once again play host to the UK’s largest diversity awards for an evening filled with inspirational role models, celebrity guests and dynamic performances.

To secure you place at the National Diversity Awards 2017, please click here

A word from Graham Norton
Comedian, Television & Radio Presenter
‘’Promoting and celebrating diversity is close to my heart which is why I am thrilled to support The National Diversity Awards! I want to wish all of this year’s nominees the best of luck for the ceremony, you all deserve to win!’’

WeAreTheCity’s Rising Star Awards 2017 shortlist shines a spotlight on 200 remarkable women changing the face of business across the UK 

WeAreTheCity are proud to announce the shortlist for their 2017 Rising Star Awards.
The Rising Star Awards, now in their third year, are the only awards to solely focus on the UK’s female talent pipeline below management level. Through these annual awards they celebrate 100 individual female contributors who represent the future leaders and role models of tomorrow across twenty different industries. They hope that by raising the profile of shortlisted nominees and winners, and will also encourage organisations to consider how they strengthen the development of their female pipeline and provide opportunities for their female workforce to climb the ranks within their organisations.

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE

Massive Inter-party Applause as Nana Addo relegates Galamsey to History

Governments have come and gone, presidents and heads of state have come and gone, ministers responsible for lands and mineral resources have come and gone but none of these were able to stop galamsey or relegate it to the abyss of forgetfulness. Indeed Nana Addo has done what all the others could not do. The reason why this illegal mining could gain roots, thus becoming untouchable and unstoppable was that, influential people including top executives, politicians, chiefs and even top police and military officers, all had a stake in the galamsey by condoning, and conniving with young boys to do illegal mining for them.

Galamsey which was a crude form of the statement, “gather them and sell,” is an illegal mining activity by both young and old with the full support and connivance of big and influential men in the society. This illegal activity started long before Ghana gained its independence. Ghana happens to be the 10th leading producer of gold in the entire world and 2nd in Africa. This illegal mining activity became a blessing and a curse and this will be explained in detail in the article. The curse far outweighed the blessings due to health hazards, environmental degradation, the destruction of farm lands and the indiscriminate pollution of water bodies.

Mining itself is a major economic activity in many developing countries. In Ghana, small-scale mining was once a respected traditional vocation. In the late 80s, the government officially legalized small-scale mining. This decision brought to the fore some challenges, including the mechanism by which the government granted concession to peasants. The process was very cumbersome and slow, thus compelling many to mine illicitly. Galamsey began in earnest and boomed from regime to regime, only to intensify during Mahama’s regime. Since then galamsey became a source of livelihood for those who live near the legal mining communities. They were motivated to enter the illegal mining due to unemployment, poverty and increase in price of gold in the world market. As a result many people including the jobless have swarmed the mining areas to engage in galamsey. Even those whose cocoa trees could not yield much, have abandoned farming and joined the galamsey business.

Ghana is naturally well endowed with fresh water sources. The abundance of water sources was an envy of most countries that have no such water sources. Sadly enough, these illegal miners are busy polluting and destroying our enviable, fresh and drinkable water sources right under the very noses of governments, local authorities and concerned Ghanaians. Environmentalists and climate scientists have consistently warned the local population that if the destruction and pollution of the water sources persist, within the next 20 to 30 years, water will have to be imported from other countries. These shameless and illegal miners do not think or are even conscious of any precautionary measures to be taken to abate the nuisance. The mighty river Supong which runs in Asiakwa in the Eastern region is a pathetic example of continuous pollution. Supong River which once provided cool, clean and extremely refreshing water to drink has now turned smelly and yellowish. The river is now filled with mud, algae and weeds.

The situation became worse when the Chinese travelled to Ghana in their numbers and directed their journeys towards the gold mining areas in the Ashanti, Western and Eastern regions. Their presence was much felt during the rule of former president Mahama. Majority of them joined the illegal mining. Some of them were fronted and aided by Ghanaians to register small scale mining companies. Since they had a lot of money, they were able to pay the local chiefs for land to be released for their mining activities to begin. Even cocoa farms were sold to them to be destroyed for gold mining purposes. Heavy machines including excavators and tipper trucks were brought from China to help in their search for gold. Soon they began to destroy more farms and water bodies with cyanide and other dangerous products used to fish for the gold.

Concerned Ghanaians protested against the Chinese involvement in galamsey and small scale mining. The Chinese met the anger and protest of Ghanaians with force. So far not less than ten Ghanaians have been shot dead by the Chinese and not even a single Chinese was put before court. The gaping holes created by illegal mining have trapped and killed many children, women and farmers. Yet they are heavily protected by police and retired soldiers in military uniforms.

Small scale mining and not galamsey could have been an important source of livelihood for relatively low-income Ghanaians, as well as highly significant for the economy as a whole. Sadly enough, this area has been taking over by Chinese in contravention of the Mineral and Mining Act 206 and Act 703. These Acts outline clearly that small scale mining is strictly reserved for Ghanaians. If the law says so, why then do we allow Chinese citizens to enter and completely take over small-scale mining? The Chinese are smarter. They put Ghanaians in the fore-front to register the companies on their behalf.

The situation in the mining areas had gotten out of hand. Cocoa trees and other crops were being uprooted and destroyed by the Chinese to give way to galamsey and small-scale mining. The environment was being destroyed, water bodies were being polluted, gaping holes were being abandoned in the forest, abandoned holes have ensnared and killed many and the Chinese are gunning down and hacking people down at random. Several complaints and protests were launched by concerned Ghanaians for an effective leader and government to emerge to save the mining areas from illegal miners.

Happily in January 2017, a courageous leader, a visionary, a disciplined and an incorrupt man, Nana Addo Dankwah Akufo-Addo was sworn in as the fifth president of Ghana. One Friday in

galamsey ‘queen’ Aisha Huang

Kumasi, few months after assuming power as a deputy Minister for lands and mineral resources, Madam Barbara Oteng Gyasi disclosed in Kumasi that the NPP government would soon apply force and technology to fight illegal miners and warned those involved to refrain  from the practice.

Her message fell on deaf ears. Military men and police officers were deployed to the mining areas and with the help of detective devices they were able to drive illegal miners away and all their excavators and other equipment were seized. A die-hard, stubborn Chinese woman named Aisha was arrested three times for illegal mining despite the government’s ban. She was released three times because she blackmailed the powers that be with tapes and videos she commissioned Chinese women to have sexual encounter with Ghanaian power brokers. After her startling revelations, she was arrested for the fourth and this arrest may probably be the last and she may either be imprisoned or repatriated to China.
Already majority of Ghanaians are applauding Nana Addo for his determination to relegate illegal mining into the abyss of forgetfulness and to ensure that small scale miners conform to the laws. The government has a great job on its hand to clean the polluted water bodies and to fill all the gaping holes to prevent further accidents.

By Stephen Atta Owusu

Win Tickets to the IAAF World Championships!

A leading Caribbean bank is conducting an online survey to seek the views of our readers to help them improve the products and services they offer. The research is being conducted in conjunction with research agency HPI Research.

The Voice Newspaper would be grateful if you could take around 15 minutes to fill out this simple survey and when completed, you will be automatically entered into a prize draw with the opportunity to win two tickets to the IAAF World Championships in August 2017.

To complete the survey please click the following link and, if you have any problems, please copy and paste the link into your browser: https://ourvoice.co.uk/survey2/?ID=1309&qs=1

All of your answers will be treated in the strictest confidence, in accordance with the Market Research Society Code of Conduct and not passed on to any third parties. They just want to hear your opinions and views, and these will be used for research purposes only. The survey will remain open until 2nd of June.

If you have any questions please get in touch by sending us an email toresearchsurveys1@gmail.com

MISS GHANA UK 2017 – AUDITIONS NOW OPEN!

It’s that time of the year again ladies! The search is on to crown the next Miss Ghana UK 2017. So if you think you’ve got what it takes to win the crown, then read on -> -> ->
DATE
 Sunday  4th June 2017
VENUE
Dance Studio
Woodhouse College
Woodhouse Road,
North Finchley
London
N12 9EY
How to get there
Driving use: N12 9EY
Tube: Piccadilly line to Bounds Green then bus 221 towards North Finchley or Edgware (stops outside college)
Tube: Northern Line to Finchley Central then bus 13, 460 to North Finchley then 5 mins walk or buses 134, 221
Buses: 134, 221(from outside Argos) stops outside the college
Buses that goes near college with short walk   13, 43, 125,263, 382,
British Rail: Great Northern to New Southgate then bus 221 towards North Finchley or Edgware (stops outside college)
TIME
 2.30pm sharp
ATTIRE
Blue Skinny Jeans, White vest top, Black heeled Sandals.
Please bring ID

PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL AND TOYOTA USA SIGN ON AS CO-PRESENTING SPONSORS OF THE 2017 PAN-AFRICAN WEEKEND NYC

The Pan-African Weekend to celebrate the best of the pan-African community with women’s forum, networking events, and formal awards gala

Prudential Financial Inc. and Toyota USA have signed on as co-presenting sponsors of the 2017 Pan-African Weekend produced by Face2face Africa.

In its 6th annual edition, the Pan-African Weekend is a multi-day event that highlights and celebrates the best of the pan-African community. The action-packed schedule includes the Pan-African Women Forum, the IAAPA Networking Mixer, and the closing Jazz Brunch.

The highlight of the weekend is the FACE List Awards, the most prestigious celebration of pan-African achievement in the Unites States, where pioneers and trailblazers of African descent are honored for their contributions and impact on society.

The Pan-Weekend Weekend has given us the unique opportunity to tell a new narrative on people of African descent in this country and around the world. We are proud to have Prudential returning for the second consecutive year as presenting sponsor, and we are thrilled that Toyota will be joining them this year as co-Presenting Sponsor.  Both companies have demonstrated their unyielding commitment to empowering and equipping members of our community with the tools and resources that we need to change our story”, said CEO of Face2face Africa Isaac. O. Babu-Boateng.

The 2017 Pan-African Weekend kicks off Thursday, July 13th, and concludes on Sunday, July 16th.

Speaking on the partnership with Face2face Africa, Dorinda Walker, Prudential Financial’s Vice President of Consumer Strategy and Key initiatives said:

Prudential’s ongoing sponsorship of Face2face Africa’s Pan-African Weekend is not just about discussing the type of financial services we provide. We’ve been able to share educational information with Pan-African community members on how to save, invest and reach their long-term financial goals. The attendees leave the Pan-African Weekend with Prudential top of mind, knowing that we are ready, willing, and able to work with them to achieve prosperity and peace of mind.

This year, Toyota USA has also joined the Pan-African Weekend as the official auto sponsor.

Toyota is proud to be a sponsor of Pan African Weekend, an event that celebrates the individuals in the Pan African community who are committed to transforming society,” said Mia Phillips, National Manager- Brand, Multicultural & Crossline Marketing Strategy.

For more information on the Pan-African Weekend, visit: panafricanweekend.com or contact info@f2fafrica.com.

REGISTER HERE

Ghanaian-British Entrepreneur Runs U.K.’s 1st African Fine-Dining Food Brand

While African cuisine may be extremely popular locally, it is yet to be appreciated globally in fine-dining. In addition, lovers of African cuisine often find it difficult to access real African food overseas.

It is this under-representation that motivated Adwoa Hagan-Mensah, a Ghanaian-born British entrepreneur, to incorporate real West African cuisine in to London’s food culture.

For Hagan-Mensah, who now owns East Jollof London (EJL), a highly successful luxury catering company in the U.K., her story is of turning passion into a profitable venture.

Her Beginnings

Samples of cuisines prepared by Eat Jollof London. Photo credit: Eat Jollof London

Speaking to Face2Face Africa in a recent interview, Hagan-Mensah explained that the idea to start a catering company came when she was in college in the U.K.

As a foreign student, Hagan-Mensah had to work hard to make ends meet since she needed money for her school fees and general upkeep.

So she decided to start cooking and delivering food to fellow students as a part-time job. Hagan-Mensah started with British cuisines but would occasionally throw in some West African staples for a change.

Eventually, she realized that students from other countries had a real appetite for West African dishes, and this gave her the courage and inspiration to start the first Ghanaian street food stall, Jollof Pot, in London.

“At university, I paid my rent cooking and delivering pre-packed West African dishes to students,” Hagan-Mensah says. “It was then I realized my passion was in West African food and catering, and [I] have never looked back.”

For Hagan-Mensah, her mother, who taught her how to cook at a tender age and continued to have her cook during school holidays, serves as her chief inspiration for West African dishes.

“To this day, I am unable to cook small for small numbers. She inspired me to be inventive with Ghanaian ingredients and she continues to be a huge inspiration to this day,” Hagan-Mensah adds.

Her Big Break

In 2012, Hagan-Mensah appeared on BBC2’s program “The Restaurant,” a popular British reality TV series where a group of couples compete for a chance to set up a restaurant financially

A waitress at Eat Jollof London. Photo credit: Eat Jollof London

backed and personally supported by French chef Raymond Blanc.

Jollof Pot, which she co-founded with her husband Lloyd Mensah 15 years ago, has since been renamed Spinach & Agushi and has street stands at Portobello Road in Notting Hill, Exmouth Market in Farringdon, and Broadway Market in Hackney.

All these outlets operate under the umbrella company Eat Jollof London, which specializes in corporate events and weddings.

By offering luxury catering and fine-dining services, Hagan-Mensah is paving the way for West African cuisine to be given the Michelin star treatment it deserves.

Unique Cuisine

A chef preparing food at Eat Jollof London. Photo credit: Eat Jollof London

According to Hagan-Mensah, Eat Jollof London serves both the millions of Africans living in the U.K. as well as foreign clients who want to have a taste of real West African cuisine. A lot of her African clients want to enjoy the real food flavors they grew up with — albeit with a look and taste that is different from home cooking.

“Our chef spent a lot of time tweaking traditional dishes and adding the EJL flare to each dish. [The] presentation of each dish is also a very important aspect of what we do,” says Hagan-Mensah.

Among the many unique West African dishes that EJL prepares, jollof rice is the most popular, with Hagan-Mensah revealing that they had to bring in chefs from several West African countries, including Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, the Gambia, and the Ivory Coast, to help reinvent the dish.

Hagan-Mensah is currently considering opening branches in Ghana and Nigeria. She has also established the Ghana Super Club, a bimonthly dinner, to taste traditional Ghanaian flavors in Kent.

Article via Face2FaceAfrica

KINGSBY LONDON LTD PARTNERS WITH GUBA AWARDS

Renowned gold merchants – Kingsby London Ltd are category sponsors of the 6th annual GUBA Awards, taking place on Saturday 3rd of June 2017, at the Intercontinental Hotel, o2, London. Kingsby London will be sponsoring the GUBA Professional of the Year award.

Kingsby London Ltd is an independent bullion dealer that operates outside the banking system. By offering gold ingots in smaller units, their aim is to make investment grade gold affordable and accessible to the wider public. Their ingots range from 1 gram to 100 gram in size and are presented in an enclosed security case that can be instantly authenticated by downloading the CertiEye application on your smartphone.

Each ingot case is printed with a unique serial number issued by The Assay Office London; matching the number imprinted in the bullion bar to act as a certificate. Their business partnership with the Assay Office London also means that every ingot carries the world renowned ‘Leopard’s head’ hallmark also historically known as the ‘Kings Mark’. Kingsby Bars will be available to purchase online from June.

Kingsby London Ltd also offers fine jewellery under the trading name – Kingsby Diamonds. With variations of silver, platinum, white, yellow and rose gold, customers are able to customise their engagement and wedding rings to reflect their personal taste, style and budget. Each Kingsby diamond is independently certified by the leading international gemmological laboratories.

Speaking on the sponsorship, Managing Director of Kingsby London Ltd, Maximus Afriyie-Barwuah states:  “GUBA Awards celebrates excellence and promotes personal and collective growth. As an aspirational luxury brand that shares these common values we are proud to be a sponsor. We continue to bridge the gap between Africa and the International Community and endeavour to create added value in our activities. GUBA is an ideal partner in facilitating these objectives.’’

CEO of GUBA Enterprise Dentaa Amoateng MBE adds: “GUBA Awards is pleased to have Kingsby London. Kingsby London’s unique investment grade bars is a wonderful addition to the GUBA 2017 Awards.”

Kingsby Diamonds ensures their diamonds are sourced ethically from reputable suppliers in line with the Kimberley process treaty established in 2003 to stem the flow of conflict diamonds. To find out more about investing in gold bullion bars visit www.kingsbylondon.com . For customised engagement and wedding rings go to www.kingsbydiamonds.com.

GUBA 2017 Awards promises to be an elegant and entertaining evening. Tickets are currently available at www.gubaawards.co.uk/ticket

Technical Education Key To Country’s Future…

Nana Akufo-Addo tells student audience that country must invest in education to prosper

Technical higher education will be one of the driving forces in Ghana’s industrial revolution, according to the nation’s president.

In a recent speech to students at Ho Technical University, Nana Akufo-Addo told them the country’s goals will be achieved through the work that goes on in institutions such as theirs.

“If the ambitions we have for this country are going to come into fruition, a great deal of it depends on what is going to happen in places like this,” he said. “You are going to be at the centre of the industrial revolution of our country.”

Mr Akufo-Addo, who was speaking as part of a two-day working visit to Ghana’s Volta Region, said that his government was prioritising education – particularly technical provision – to improve the economy, the government of Ghana’s website reported.

Ghana would continue to be poor if it maintained its position as a nation reliant on the production of raw materials, he warned.

At the same event, GhanaWeb reported him as saying that countries formerly similar to Ghana were now “places of prosperity and development” as a result of committing “a lot of resources” to developing their education systems, with “technical and scientific” provision at the forefront.

“[Technical education] is the key to our future,” Mr Akufo-Addo said. “Whatever we can do to support your development, to make it relatively easy for you to study hard and to get the information to be able to contribute to the progress and development of the country, the Akufo-Addo administration is going to do exactly that.”

john.elmes@timeshighereducation.com

Source: https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/ghana-president-technical-education-key-countrys-future#survey-answer