October 2012


“Small girls” you did us proud!

Black Maidens win bronze at FIFA U-17 World Cup

 

It was arguably Ghana’s most significant sporting achievement this year; when Ghana’s Black Maidens captured the bronze medal at the Fifa U- 17 World Cup in Azerbaijan. Priscilla Okyere’s goal was good enough for Ghana to overcome a numerical disadvantage (they were down to 10 women) as the Black Maidens beat Germany in the match for third place. They became the first African team to gain a podium finish at the women’s U-17 showpiece as well as achieving Ghana’s highest ever finish at a women’s FIFA tournament.

Their win came on the same day as the men’s senior team booked their place at CAN 2013 with a win over Malawi. In my opinion the former was the bigger achievement, because whilst the Black Stars were expected to qualify the Black Maidens were the surprise package in their competition.  Their march all the way to the semi-finals was not predicted by many but the earned many admirers on their way there. Traditionally Ghana have failed to make much of an impact in women’s football but could this be about to change now?

One thing is certain though and that is; this achievement needs to be celebrated. Too many times we are critical when things are not going well for Ghana in the sporting arena. Thus when we do achieve success we do not give it the maximum recognition it deserves.  Other nations give their sporting achievers knighthoods, honorary degrees and various types of other awards, yet in Ghana we sometimes act if we expect nothing less than victory.

So I was very pleased to hear that on arrival back to Ghana from Azerbaijan the Black Maidens were hosted by the President at Osu Castle. The players will also receive a bonus of $3,000 each for their efforts. It is recognition and incentives like this that will create a culture of pride in representing Ghana in international competition.

My wish is that the young women of Ghana are inspired by the exploits of the Azerbaijan and that their achievement is just the beginning for more success for Ghana in women’s football.

Ben JK Anim-Antwi (@Kwesitheauthor)

Arthur Wharton’s historic return home

Arthur Wharton Maquette to be presented to Ministry of Sports in Ghana

Arthur_Wharton_Me_FiRi_Ghana_dot_com

This week, representatives of the Arthur Wharton Foundation will be travelling to Ghana to present the Ministry of Sport with an Arthur Wharton Maquette statue – symbolically, Arthur’s return to his homeland. The handover event will take place in Jamestown, Ghana, where Arthur was born and on the date of his birth, 28th October (1865).

Arthur Wharton was the ‘World’s First Black Professional Footballer’, who made his name while playing for Darlington FC (1883-1888).

Arthur was also the ‘World’s First 100 yard Sprint Champion’, which he ran in a time of 10 seconds  at the AAA Championships at Stamford Bridge, London, in 1886; a British Cycling Champion; Professional Cricketer; and he played Rugby  – a remarkable sportsman.

Ironic then, that here we are, some 130 years after Arthur Wharton pioneered the way for the black footballers of today, celebrating his achievements and contributions to football and sport and on his return to home soil,  and yet it is amidst the ugly face of racism in what is allegedly ‘The beautiful game’ that is football – in 2012.

The Arthur Wharton Foundation acknowledges and pays tribute to the work of all organizations who dedicate their time and commitment to tackling racism.

We also applaud those individuals who have put their heads above the parapet and shared their forthright opinions and actions, in recognizing the need to tackle the issues head on and in a much more demonstrative and proactive way.

The dis-connect between players, organizations, and governing bodies is a clear indication that there is something seriously wrong at the heart of the debate concerning racism in football.

Next Sunday, on the 28th October, as we present the Arthur Wharton Maquette statue to Ghanaian authorities, we ask those organizations and all others involved in the current issues to take a moment to remember Arthur Wharton, the first pioneer who blazed a trail for all black footballers of today – and tomorrow.

For more info on the Arthur Wharton Foundation contact:

Shaun Campbell (Founder – Arthur Wharton Foundation) : T +44 (0) 1325 257722 – Mob: +44 (0) 7854473516

Email: shaun@arthurwharton.com

Web: www.arthurwharton.com

Twitter: @arthurwharton

Here we go again!

 Ghana qualify for yet another CAN finals

Ghana booked themselves a place at CAN 2013 with a workmanlike performance against Malawi in Lilongwe.  With Ghana leading 2-0 from the first leg they were overwhelming favourites to go through but they were made to work for their win with the only goal of the game coming from Afriyie Acquah on his international debut.

Ghana started the game very well taking just three minutes to get into the lead after the Parma midfielder applied the finish to a well-worked short corner from Andre Ayew. Ghana went on to control the rest of the early stages of the first half, but had to rely on Adam Kwarasey’s reflexes to prevent being pegged back.

Both teams then went through a period where they threatened the goalkeepers with dangerous efforts. Asamoah Gyan was presented with a number of chances to double the lead first from a free kick which the goalkeeper did well to get to before he failed to connect with a well-placed Ayew cross as the Black Stars went into half time with a one goal lead. Christian Atsu also had an effort on the Malawi goal which was comfortably saved.

The second half almost started like the first with Ghana seemingly in control but Atsu could not get his effort on target after getting past a couple of players. It took some good positional awareness from defender Isaac Vorsah; however, to prevent the Flames from going in front as he diverted a goal bound header wide before John Boye made the clearance.

Malawi continued to rally but the Black Stars saw out the game to book a place in South Africa for the 2013 African Cup of Nations. Overall Ghana should be pleased in the manner of the qualification which has seen the emergence of two players (Christian Atsu & Afriye Acquah) tipped for great things. No doubt Ghana will be amongst the favourites for the competition in South Africa but will need to learn from mistakes of earlier this year, when again tipped for glory they crashed out at the semi-finals to eventual winner Zambia.  Here we go again!

Ben JK Anim-Antwi (@KwesiTheAuthor)

Black History Month!!

Ghanaian Culture: Celebrating 55 Years of

‘GHANA’

Black History Month in the United Kingdom begins from Monday, 1st October 2012, and ends Wednesday, 31 October 2012.

*

Why wait upon a month, to Celebrate

‘BLACK HISOTRY’

Our Year was 57, Not a Mystery!

Embrace with heart, those who left MARKS

Never forget, why we’re still LARGE.

Dr Nkrumah. Gold Coast Leader,

 A Minster, A Lecturer, BEYOND A Preacher

The Blood of Our Land, Suffered To STAND

Whilst The BRITS, Invaded,

From Stripped To TAKEN

Families AWAKEN, to see the SHAKEN

BRITS, for BLAMING

ALL too SHAMING

Mothers, fathers, from sisters to brothers,

Divided Apart, SHIPPED AFAR

OUR EMPIRE is enriched with ECHOES of SORROWS

              Yaa Asantewaa, FEMALE WARRIOR, Intelligent LEADER

She Was a Believer

She Guarded our STOOL,

YOU Thought we Were FOOLS!

Soaked in Hardship,

Superiority and SHAME

As the pages flipped, Anger grew Fame

We declared our independence in 57.

Never again to serve

Although the Story seems, delight & Bright

Our Country, still suffers from Fright

In 2012, the evidence shows

Slavery EXISTS, slavery still BOLD

From 1957, GHANA has grown,

GHANA’s still young,

Never too OLD,

Embrace our 55th year, by teaching Other’s about GHANA, whether it be facts, history, or culture, spread and share our history.

Host or organise events/ activities to celebrate our history.

TIPS & IDEA’s BELOW!

 

To University Students:

*See what your Societies are running For the Month, in your SU.

*Or Start up an event, & get peeps involved

To College Student’s:

*Host activities in your canteen, or clubs to celebrate

                                                   *See What the College Have Lined Up,

Take Part, and get peeps involved

To Others:

*Be Creative & Unique

* Organise or host, neighbourhood parties

(& have quizzes, snacks (GH foods), Ghanaian Games, and music, make it fun, and invite neighbours, families & friends.)

___________________________________________________________________________

TWEET The Team YOUR Ideas, for the MONTH!

>>> @MeFiRi_GHANA

 

By Trey’C

Express your comment’s below

Introducing you to…

GUBA Award Nominee Brie Boateng

 

Mefiri Ghana meets with Brie Boateng, an up and coming artist nominated for the 2012 GUBA Awards in the Emerging Music categories. She shares with us her pet peeves, favourite food and being nominated for a GUBA award…

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Mefiri Ghana:  Who is Brie Boateng? Introduce yourself to the world. Brie Boateng:  I’m a young entrepreneur – lover of music – passionate about people – born again Christian.

MFG: Congratulations on your GUBA awards nomination. Was it something you expected? BB: Thank you. I didn’t expect it at all – there are so many British based Ghanaian artists that are doing incredibly well in the music scene – I didn’t expect to be up against some of them. But I’m really chuffed so PLEASE KEEP voting for me – I’m in the emerging music category – http://www.gubaawards.co.uk/gubavoting/

MFG: What are your thoughts on the GUBA awards and what it stands for?BB: It’s a great idea. Many Ghanaians in the UK are contributing highly in so many industries from health to education to media etc. Receiving an award to accredit your achievements -famous or not- is a good thing. The GUBA’s stands up for the achievements of Ghanaians living in the UK and honours us in front of the nation.

MFG: Describe your music style in 3 words. BB: Meaningful, catchy, quirky

MFG: Who has been the biggest inspiration in your life so far? BB: Sounds cliché but it is my mum – and my late father. I’m realising more and more that my mum’s business acumen and work ethic is rubbing off on me. She’s a business owner working in the field she’s always wanted to. She isn’t afraid to take risks and travel far and wide to support her business. My dad introduced me to the music scene – some of his favourite artists are also some of mine.                                                                                                                                                             

MFG: Tell us about any pet peeves you have.  BB:Lol erm. Just unnecessary rudeness and negativity.                                                     

MFG: Apart from music is there anything else that you pursue?  BB: My organisation Pass Peace On – it’s creates funding opportunities for individuals who are passionate about social responsibility. I also volunteer at my local homeless charity and donate regular time to housing projects in my local community.

MFG: How would you describe your musical journey so far? BB: It’s been great! I’m getting out what I’ve put in. And in hindsight, I’m really thankful for some of the opportunities I didn’t receive – it helped me refocus on what’s important. In my music career, I’ve helped to uplift people and spread encouragement. I launched a campaign to speak out against domestic abuse using one of my singles, I’ve released inspiring house and dubstep music and have written for several artists – including many UK based Ghanaian artists. I’m never short of music work. I think the only problem is making time for it all.

MFG: Where can we find out about you and any future projects you got going? BB: I usually keep people posted on my twitter feed @brieboateng but will soon have my own site brieboateng.com fully complete.

MFG: Do you have any particular mottos that you follow? BB: Not really. Although I once came across a slogan ‘Give joy Get joy’ and that stuck with me for a while.

MFG: And finally tell us, what’s your favourite Ghanaian food?BB: FUFU! With any soup. Makes me feel gooood!

*To vote for Brie Boateng visit: http://www.gubaawards.co.uk/gubavoting/ Twitter: @brieboateng

By Yaa Nyarko

VOTE for Me FiRi Ghana’s Charity – WAM Campaign…

We need YOUR support…

 

Please vote for our charity

“WAM Campaign”

 

CLICK HERE TO VOTE WAM 🙂

 

WAM Campaign - Volunteer in Ghana

 

Volunteer in Ghana this Christmas

Click here to Register guys…


Your role as a volunteer, fundraiser or supporter, is to contribute your skills, gifts and talents in the best way you can, to empower the lives of others, because as we say here at WAM “The best of YOU, comes out when YOU give your best to others…

Visit our website for more information:

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To be fair or to be dark…?

Colour Code: What Shade Of Black?

 

Last year I spent some time in a part of south central Asia. I would hesitate to call these people racists but they do have a pretty down trodden view of a dark skin tone. Everyone in the TV adverts is fair-skinned. They even have skin products that block out the darkening effects of the sun and make the skin much fairer. And it’s a thriving business. All the big western cosmetic companies that make millions from selling tanning lotions in the west make just as much money, if not more, selling products that do the exact opposite on this side of the globe.

I was not sure who was more surprised at this; me or these white Europeans I was with. They would not pass up an opportunity to lay in the sun to top up their tan. The locals however found it absurd that people in the west would even pay to go on the sunbeds. And their concern was not because of the health risk related to the constant exposure to UV rays; rather, they found a pale skin colour to be much more desirable than a tan.

Apart from Alek Wek, I am struggling to think of any other very dark skinned female fashion icon. I think our standard of beauty as Africans and black people, has a leaning towards a fair skin tone. It is what we see on TV and in the lads’ magazines that shapes this view. Beyonce, Nikki Minaj and Rihanna look whiter with each new music video. I checked the colour settings on my TV twice this week already, so it cannot be that. And I’ve had my eyes checked too – well that is only because I wanted an excuse to buy myself one of those cool Ray Ban glasses – but it turns out my sight is impeccable.

So Hollywood favours a tan, Bollywood a pale skin but what does Nollywood say? Is it Alek or Bey, licorice or caramel? Personally, I like a bag of M&Ms.

By Maclean Arthur

Nadia Buari’s new look…

Nadia Buari’s new weight loss – Yay or Nay?

 

Nadia Buari has been a way for a while but now she is back looking sexy, stunning and slimmer. Photos of the leading Ghanaian actress were seen on Instagram (IAmNadiaBuari) showing her recent loss weight.

In a recent interview she stated that she had lost 10k in 6 months. If you were wondering how Nadia did it, well it was a change of meals, an exercise regime that included Yoga and Pilates four times a week and evening jogging every day.

 

But it seems that Nadia’s new look has sparked mixed reactions as some fans are not happy or worried.

“The Nadia Buari we know has always looked healthy. But what I saw today in my opinion is not that of a healthy person”

Another fan commented saying:

“Nadia what is this? Were you forced to lose weight? Ghanaians need an explanation to this your thinness oooooo” 

Despite what people think, Nadia seems to be really proud of her new look and continues to flaunt it in LA, as she is spotted heading to meetings with producers and hanging out with her brother Majeed ‘Jeed Rogers’ Buari.

Check out the pictures below and let us know what you think.

By Kimberley Osei-Abeyie

Ghana’s economy – Gold

Ghana’s Gold

 

Although there is a serious lack of Gold medals in our Olympic history, there is no shortage of the metallic shiny element in Ghana. Our economy depends largely on exports of cocoa and gold, and the latter has been the main focus of Ghana’s mining and minerals development industry since the 1990’s. Ghana is Africa’s 2nd largest gold producer, producing on average 80.5 tones a year.

More than 90% of gold production in the early 1990s came from underground mines in western and Ashanti Region, with the remainder coming from river beds in Ashanti Region and Central Region. In 1992, Ghana’s gold production surpassed 1 million fine ounces, up from 327,000 fine ounces in 1987. In March 1994, the Ghanaian government announced that it would sell half of its 55% stake in AGC for an estimated US$250 million, which would then be spent on development projects.

In October 2005, Red Back Mining of Canada [through its subsidiary Chirano Gold Mines Limited (CGML)] commissioned a new mine in Ghana. The mine, known as the Chirano gold mine, was an open pit operation located about 21 kilometers (km) to the south of AngloGold Ashanti’s Bibiani gold mine in western Ghana. The Chirano gold mine produced 941 kilograms (kg) (reported as 30,247 troy ounces) in 2005 and was 100% owned by Red Back; the Government had the option to exercise its right to back into a 10% ownership in CGML. Chirano was scheduled to produce an average of about 3,800 kg (reported as 123,000 troy ounces) per year during a period of 8½ years.

Since then several more mines have been opened in Ghana since Chirano. The most notable being the Amoanda mining pit (during the fourth quarter of 2005) and the Rex pit (in 2007).

According to figures released earlier this year by the Ghana Chamber of Mines, revenue made from gold mined in Ghana and sold on the international market was $4.6 billion in 2011, up from $3.6 billion in 2010. Ghana’s major trading partners for exports such as gold are the European Union, United States, Nigeria, and Togo.

So my question is with all the gold revenue made by Ghana in the 90’s to the present day why do we still lack the funding for many infrastructure projects within Ghana? Is the money being mismanaged? Or is there more to it than that?

I want to know your thoughts. Leave your comments below.

Ben JK Anim-Antwi (@Kwesitheauthor)

GAA gears up for 2016 Olympics

Ghana Athletics Association begin preparations for 2016 Olympics

 

The next Olympic Games billed for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil might be four years away, but for the Ghana Athletics Association (GAA), a country is as good as the level of preparations for the quadrennial gathering.

After Team Ghana returned home from the London Olympic Games empty, the GAA are concerned about overturning the trend in four years at the next competition slated for Brazil in 2016.

Bawa Fuseini, General Secretary of GAA told GNA Sports his outfit seeks to fashion out several programmes aimed at gifting Ghana enough preparation and talent for the ensuing years to fit into the larger plan of excelling at the next Olympics.

“We are trying to change our mode of selection into the national team. Previously, we only invited the regional teams to compete at the national level to aid selection into the national team. But this time we want to give more athletes a chance by organizing competitions at the district level, through to the regional and the national.

“We realize that some of the athletes who are far from the capital in small towns and villages are usually left out. But that is what we are trying to halt and give all talents enough chance. It means every athlete will have three opportunities to make it to the national team per our new policy.”

He said the innovation scheduled to take off next year is expected to begin with the district competitions in January and the Regional event in February before the national gathering that will serve the final selection.

The final team, according to the General Secretary, will undergo long camping sessions in their quest to build a strong team ahead of the African Junior Championship in Kigali, Rwanda plus other events.

He said the focal point is to build a strong junior team serving as the feeder team for the senior team, which he concedes is aging.

“Granting the younger athletes that much exposure is a fine way of preparing them for what is ahead of them and getting them ready to compete for the nation. Often, for most of them, it is good enough to get called up.

“Competition especially for the country goes beyond that. That also will serve as the transition point to the senior team and also get more junior athletes to hold together the team.

“Few years ago, we only had Aziz Zakari as the only senior athlete running just at 10.2s. The closest was making 10.6s and there was no junior athlete to offer them competition. With the chain of supply available, we could do very well as a country and this is what we are trying to depart from.”

Meanwhile, the GAA is expected to announce their selection criteria next year.

Source: Ghanaweb